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Pineapple Heaven by Doretha Albee







Pineapple Heaven 1997 Doretha Albee (used with permission of the editor)


Round 1:
Create the center ring and be careful that the picots are all exactly alike.
R 1 -(3/8" long) repeat 8 more times climbing out of the ring by using the lock stitch (or tying the threads together) to create the 10th picot.

Round 2:
Take the mock picot thus formed and twist it clockwise 3 times. CH 3 - 3 +(shuttle join into the next picot which has also been twisted clockwise 3 times. Continue around joining into the base of the first chain made. Cut and tie.
OR,
Tat the last chain to the picot and create the split chain by attaching the shuttle thread at the point where the initial chain began and tying 3 DS onto that bare thread and back to the mid point. Create a picot by using the lock stitch or tying the threads together.

Twisted picots: throughout this pattern insert your crochet hook into the picot and turn hook and picot clockwise three times.

Round 3:
If you cut and tied round 2 then attach to any free picot by using a shuttle join. Otherwise just begin to chain from where the mock picot was tied.
CH 4 - 4 +(shuttle join into the next picot of previous round) continue around joining into the base of the first chain made. Cut and tie.
OR
Tat the chain to the mid point and create split chain as before climbing out after the mock picot is tied.

Round 4:
If you cut and tied round 3 then tat the first ring joining to a free picot from round 3. Otherwise create a split ring of 4 / 4 and close ring. RW
CH 2 - 2 RW
R 4 + (join into the space picot as the initial ring) 4. RW
CH 4 - 4 RW Repeat around.

SHELL: these two rings just made joined into the same picot will be refereed to as a shell in the following rounds. Throughout this pattern the shell consists of the same pattern R 4 + 4; CH 2 - 2; R 4 + 4. Always attach the shell into the picot of the shell in the previous round.

Note: as you can see this pattern may be worked the traditional way by cutting and tying off each round. However, by using the split ring and split chain techniques, the doily can progress through many rounds without cutting and making ends to be hidden. Bear this in mind as the instructions continue.

Round 5:
Tat shell of R 4 +(join to the picot of the short chain of the previous round) 4 RW
CH 2 - 2 RW
R 4 + (join to the same picot as the initial ring) 4 close ring RW
CH 6 + (join to the picot of the long chain of the previous round) 6 RW Repeat around.

Round 6:
Tat shell of R 4 +(join to the picot of the short chain in the shell of the previous round 4 close ring. RW
CH 2 - 2
R 4 + (join into the same picot as the initial ring) 4 close.
CH 7 -(3/8" long) 1; repeat three more times; CH 6. RW Repeat around.

Round 7:
Tat shell as directed above.
CH 5 - * (3/8" long), CH 1 + (twist the long picot of the previous 3 times and join to it.
Repeat from * 3 more times making one more picot (d" long) CH 5. RW Repeat around.

There are no long picots created in this round. It should read:
Round 8:
Tat shell as directed above.
CH 5 *twist long picot of previous round 2 times and join to it.
CH 1 - 1 repeat from * 3 more times.
Twist long picot of previous round 2 times and join to it. CH 5. RW
Repeat around.


Round 9:
Tat shell.
CH 6 * + (join to the next picot of the previous round.)
CH 2 -(normal size picots) 2 repeat from * 2 more times.
Join to the next picot of the previous round CH 6. RW Repeat around.

Round 10:
Tat shell.
CH 2 - (normal size) 2 RW
R 4 + (join into the same picot as the two shell rings) 4 close ring. RW
CH 8 * + (join into the next picot) 2 - 2; repeat from * once more.
Join into the next picot CH 8. Repeat around.

Round 11:
Tat shell.
CH 3 - 3 - 3; tat another shell joining to the next picot.
CH 9 + (join into the next picot) 2 - 2 + (join into the next picot) 9. Repeat around.

Round 12:
Tat shell.
CH 3 - 3 + (join in next picot); repeat once; 3 - 3. Tat another shell.
CH 12 + (join to next picot) 12. Repeat around.

Round 13:
Tat shell.
CH 4 - 4 + (join into next picot); repeat twice; 4 - 4. Tat another shell. CH 8. Repeat around.

Round 14:
Tat shell.
CH 3 - 3 + (join into next picot. Tat another shell.
CH 5 - 5 + (join into next picot); repeat three more times; 5 - 5. Tat another shell.
CH 3 - 3 + (join at base of ring). Repeat around.

Round 15:
Join into the picot of the first shell.
*Tat shell in the next picot; + (join into picot of next shell.)
CH 5 - 5 + (join into next picot); repeat five more times. * Repeat from * to * around.

Round 16:
In this final round do not join any of the chains to the picots of the shells.
Join into picot; CH 6 - 6 + (join into next picot). Repeat around.

If made with size 40 cordonnet thread this doily would be approx. 12' in diameter.

In Memoriam:

Doretha Albee of Santee, California began tatting in 1982 while attending some classes at Brigham Young University. She took tatting classes from Marie Craig of South Carolina. Doretha became "addicted" immediately and has been an avid lace maker ever since. Of the more than 150 awards she has won at the local and state fairs, nearly half are for tatting! In 1995 she also won Best of Show at the California State Fair. From 1994-1997 she was always been among the top winners.

Doretha's love of tatting encouraged her to become co-editor of Tatting Knots and Notes with Pat Perry in 1988. Since Pat's death from cancer in 1991, Doretha has continued to share tatting with hundreds of tatters as the editor of the newsletter. Tatting and the newsletter keep her informed about the state of lacemaking throughout the world and has brought her many friends. Among her other interests are quilting, crocheting, knitting, bobbin lace, hardanger and Battenberg lace, however, tatting remains her #1 hobby and first love.

- Georgia Seitz

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Content copyright © 2013 by Georgia Seitz. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Georgia Seitz. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Georgia Seitz for details.



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