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Da Vinci - Renaissance Man

How is Da Vinci the real Renaissance man?

Typical the Renaissance man would be a man of "unquenchable curiosity" and "feverishly inventive imagination" This is exactly an accurate description of Da Vinci. This term applies to the many gifted people during the Renaissance who sought to enhance their own abilities in all areas of knowledge, even in such subjects as physical development, social accomplishments, and the arts, in contrast to the vast majority of people of that age who were not well educated. Da Vinci is actually renowned as a painter, his works include the Mona Lisa, and the Last Supper which has became the most reproduced religious painting of all time.

Leonardo is revered for his technological ingenuity. He conceptualised flying machines, a tank, concentrated solar power, an adding machine, and the double hull, also outlining a rudimentary theory of plate tectonics. He also made important discoveries in anatomy, civil engineering, optics, and hydrodynamics, but he did not publish his findings. Leonardo was an accomplished scientist, architect, engineer, painter, designer, etc. Truly, Da Vinci wasn't simply a man of the Renaissance, he was the fist prototype of the Renaissance Man.

Da Vinci wasn't just the Renaissance man due to his education, due to his many talents of many different subjects. Da Vinci was also the Renaissance man in terms of his physical appearance. Da Vinci was a man of attractive appearance, and was a very strong man, reaffirming the ideals of what a Renaissance man should process; which was intellect but also strength as well. Da Vinci also had a pleasant singing voice.

Da Vinci was the actuate example of exactly what a Renaissance man should be. He published work which were filled with Renaissance ideals. The Renaissance man couldn't just be one person who knew about one thing, they just had to be someone who was well rounded in all knowledge which Da Vinci was. Da Vinci, perhaps more than any other Renaissance figure, demonstrated the spirit of humanism, excelling in a wide variety of fields and continually seeking to educate himself through knowledge.

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