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Book Review - A Moose For Jessica

Book Review: “A Moose for Jessica”
By Pat A. Wakefield with Larry Carrara
Photos by Larry Carrara
Published 1987

In the hills of Shrewsbury, Vermont, Larry Carrara and his wife, Lila, lived a quiet life on their remote farm. Then one October morning, things changed when a male moose paid a visit.

Most of the cattle ran from the strange intruder, all except Jessica, a chubby brown and white Hereford. The moose took a shine to Jessica, and hung around – for 76 days.

I found the “love story” between Jessica and the moose a touching one. The moose would rest his head on Jessica’s back, and sometimes he’d rub his head back and forth on her back like a caress. Just as moving was the relationship that develops between the moose and Larry.

The moose seems to come to trust Larry. He let Larry come right up to him, and later, when Larry’s leave of absence from work is over, the moose adapted to his schedule, leaving when Larry left and returning (remarkably) just before Larry did. Larry believed that the moose didn’t feel comfortable when he wasn’t there.

Larry never touched the moose, although he would have liked to, and felt that he could have. He explained that he had heard that touching a wild animal would take its wildness away.

The book is beautifully illustrated with over 50 photos. “A Moose for Jessica” is a special book, one that will be equally enjoyed by children and adults alike.

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