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Reflections of 'An Afternoon with Scott Hahn' - Part 2

In this article we continue our look into īAn Afternoon with Scott Hahnī focusing on the rest of his question and answer session. In Part 1 we reflected on Purgatory, Confession and Infant Baptism. (Read Part 1)

Honor, Worship and Sacrifice

"How should we answer when someone asks us why we worship Mary?"

Dr. Hahn explained that Protestants sing and pray to God. We do too, of course, but we also sing and pray to Mary. He told us that this is where some of the confusion lies. They equate the singing and praying to worship. While, in the case of Mary, we see it as honor. We sacrifice to God and God alone. But Protestants do not sacrifice. For them, the sacrifice ended with Calvary. That is why some mistakenly think we re-sacrifice Jesus Christ at every Mass. They view once and for all to mean it is done. We see is as a perpetual sacrifice, one that is ongoing and never ends.

Jesus is our high priest. Those priests were many because they were prevented by death from remaining in office, but he, because he remains forever, has a priesthood that does not pass away. Therefore, he is always able to save those who approach God through him, since he lives forever to make intercession for them. It was fitting that we should have such a high priest: holy, innocent, undefiled, separated from sinners, higher than the heavens. (Hebrews 7:23-26)

The main point of what has been said is this: we have such a high priest, who has taken his seat at the right hand of the throne of the Majesty of heaven, a minister of the sanctuary and of the true tabernacle that the Lord, not man, set up. Now every high priest is appointed to offer gifts and sacrifices; thus the necessity for this one also to have something to offer. (Hebrews 8:1-3)


Dr. Hahn pointed out that Hebrews 8:3 says that our high priest HAVE something to offer, making once and for all a perpetual sacrifice - one that never stops.


Communion

"Why canīt I partake in communion at your church? You can at mine," questions the non-Catholic.

Dr. Hahn informed us that in the historic Protestant church one had to be a member of the church to participate in communion.

Through communion Christ gives himself to us much like a bridegroom, and we enter into a marital communion with Jesus. We have to be fully ready, just as a couple planning to marry should be prepared and enter into such a union before engaging in marital relations.

He explained that while someone is studying and preparing to become a member of the church they experience a spiritual communion, which he called silver, while one is awaiting the Eucharist, which is gold. Treasure the silver in preparation for the gold. He expressed concern that many who receive the gold might not truly receive it (as in those who might simply take it for granted and are not spirituality set for such an awesome gift) and the gold slips right through their pockets.


In Conclusion

One woman who is considering joining the church, asked, "When do you know the time is right?" With the Lord there is no timetable. When it is right for you. "Christ wants you when you canīt say no," Dr. Hahn told her.

We were given the saints, sacraments and Mary to deepen our relationship with the Father. Through them we will fall in love more with God.


Go to Part 3 - Mass: Heaven on Earth


Peace in Christ,
Melissa Knoblett-Aman






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