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High Fructose Corn Syrup Issues

Several consumer groups are fighting to have High Fructose Corn Syrup banned. Both sides put forth research that only confuses the average consumer. Research of the effects of High Fructose Corn Syrup continues. Unfortunately, conclusive research is elusive.

Many articles have been written indicating High Fructose Corn Syrup increases calorie consumption. Insulin secretion is not stimulated by Fructose. It would seem the lack of insulin stimulation would actually be a good thing. However, the lack of insulin stimulation also prevents the release of the Leptin hormone. Leptin provides the signal to your body to stop eating. The brain sends hunger signals and Leptin provides a signal to the brain to indicate the body is full. The brain in turn discontinues sending the hunger signals.

Without the production of Leptin, you are likely to continue eating more than you should. A Princeton research study indicated that rats that were fed High Fructose Corn Syrup gained more weight than rats that were fed sugar. It is important to mention that advocates of High Fructose Corn Syrup dispute this research.

Advocates claim High Fructose Corn Syrup is a "natural" product. However, opponents claim it is not. Opponents claim that the corn used in the production of High Fructose Corn Syrup is genetically modified; therefore, High Fructose Corn Syrup cannot be a "natural" substance. The current FDA stance is that High Fructose Corn Syrup manufacturers can claim the product is "natural."

The debate over High Fructose Corn Syrup continues. In the meantime, consumers are left bewildered by conflicting facts and information. Many food companies are producing products that do not contain High Fructose Corn Syrup. This gives consumers a choice to purchase products free of High Fructose Corn Syrup.

One thing is certain; eating unprocessed foods is healthier than eating processed foods. By choosing healthier foods, you will reduce your consumption of High Fructose Corn Syrup.

In the meantime, the debate and research continues.

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