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Tennis Elbow- Mouse Use can cause Elbow Pain


Epicondylitis is pain at either side of the elbow where the finger and wrist muscles originate at the bony bumps of the humerus (upper arm bone).

Although frequently mistakenly thought of as a tendinitis, epicondylitis is caused by the accumulation of microscopic tearing and damage. The gradual accumulation of tearing and scarring that can be caused by repetitive trauma initially causes inflammation; However, eventually, as the body is unable to heal the build-up of daily injury, the condition changes from one of inflammation to one of degeneration. A physical change in the cellular structure of the tendons occurs including disorganization of the collagen fibers, calcifications, and loss of blood flow to the area.

The proper classification of this injury is a tendinosis, a failed healing of microscopic tissue tears. This can become an important distinction in prevention and healing of these injuries. In the early stages, treatments for inflammation such as the use of cold packs and the use of anti-inflammatory medications may be helpful. In the later stages, however, the goal may be to improve circulation to promote healing in addition to specific conditioning exercises to help organize the tissues around the elbow.

Tennis Elbow

Golfer's Elbow

SYMPTOMS

COMPUTER-RELATED CAUSES OF EPICONDYLITIS

One of the most common causes of tennis or golfer�s elbow for computer users can be positioning of the mouse.

OTHER OFFICE-RELATED CAUSES OF EPICONDYLITIS

CAUSES OF EPICONDYLITIS RELATED TO TRAVEL

Those using laptops or traveling frequently on business are also at high risk.
PREVENTION FOR COMPUTER, OFFICE & TRAVEL RELATED CAUSES OF EPICONDYLITIS

Mouse use

Mouse Positioning

Mouse Style

Office & Travel Tips

General Tips

Marji Hajic is an Occupational Therapist and a Certified Hand Therapist practicing in Santa Barbara, California. For more information on hand and upper extremity injuries, prevention and recovery, visit Hand Health Resources.


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