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Beaded Open Daisy Chains

Daisy chains are lots of fun, and one of the easiest seed bead projects to learn. I remember learning how to do daisy chains from my mom when I was about 10.
This isn't the classic daisy chain, it's open with strands of seed beads making stems between the daisy.
This is a bracelet I made my daughter using this technique.

Since it didn't photograph well with all the shiny silver lined beads, I remade it in purple so it's a bit clearer.


I used
Size 11 seed beads in 3 colors (green, your flower color, and your center color.)
You can use more colors and use it as a way to clean up spilled seed beads in your bead tray.
Size 12 needle. I like the short ones.
Sono beading thread
A clasp if you are making a bracelet, but a long chain can be made without a clasp.

It was my first time using Sono since I've got so much Silamide. I really liked Sono for the daisy chains, it's pretty strong which is a good thing for something like this that doesn't have a bunch of thread passes. To thread my size 12 needle, I used pliers to flatten the end of the thread.
Thread your needle and put on a stop bead with enough of a tail to sew on your clasp. Previous steps are greyed out.
String on 9 green beads, and pass your needle and thread down through the 4 bead from the end to create the leaf picot, add 5 more green beads.

Add 4 flower color beads, and one center bead, then pass your needle and thread up through the first flower color bead.

Add 2 more flower color beads, and pass your needle and thread down through the 4th flower color bead from the previous step.

Repeat for pattern.


In my example, 8 flowers was long enough to make a bracelet (the purple example) and I made the last stem only 3 beads. Then I add the clasp on an 8 bead loop, and did another chain in the opposite direction to the other clasp using 3 beads for the last stem on that one which offset the two chains.
I hope you enjoy making daisy chains!
If you liked this article, I really recommend Horace Goodhue's wonderful book. It's got a lot of great chain patterns in it, and it's a classic.

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Content copyright © 2013 by Shala Kerrigan. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Shala Kerrigan. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Shala Kerrigan for details.



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