g
Printer Friendly Version

editor  
BellaOnline's Alzheimers Editor
 

Holiday Tips for the Caregiver

The Holidays are coming and along with it fun and nervous energy. As a caregiver to an Alzheimerís patient, it is often difficult to feel festive and grateful. However, this is the time to get grounded and befriend yourself. Music, humor, decoration and aromatherapy will envelope you by signaling to your senses and so to your mind, that life is a series of recoveries and we must enjoy the interim. Open the door and invite people inside to help you, allow them to show their compassion and you can share the wisdom of your experience with them.

Taking care of two parents with Alzheimerís taught me to live in the moment and let go of old baggage. The moment is all we really have. Being truly present and in focus helps one to live life more intensely and in greater joy as opposed to experiencing life with a loose mind. When I sip my morning coffee and look out the window, I reset my natural rhythm according to the season.

This holiday season avoid the traditional weight gain which is unhealthy for you, physically and emotionally. By weight gain I also mean a heavy heart filled with resentment. As a result of this emotional burden, many of us eat to fill an empty heart, packing on the unhealthy pounds. We keep super busy to escape the deficits of our own personalities, our unhappiness and disappointments. We become Addicted to Stress. For timely help on managing your stress please view my interview on ABCís Good Morning America Now. Itís time to realize the pattern of Stress Addiction.
addicted to stessWe begin to define ourselves based on what we do and as caregivers we define ourselves as sacrificial givers. However, I am here to tell you that you are so much more. It is time to reclaim your true identity. You have a right to your authentic life and to just breatheÖ donít feel guilty about having fun or feeling happy.

While new Alzheimerís research continues with a few steps forward and one back, we learn from the errors. For example, Ginko Biloba, which used to be touted in Alzheimerís prevention, is a supplement which does not prevent or treat Alzheimerís. In fact, neither does royal bee jelly. From my own experience with both my parents these supplements did not work to alleviate their symptoms, but now research proves my own personal observation. Meanwhile, the link between diabetes and Alzheimerís gets stronger and therefore it is important to be vigilant about food, exercise and medication needed to keep diabetes under control. In fact, some of the medications for diabetes apparently, help to reduce Alzheimerís plaques in the brain and so, these medications are being studied as a possible new treatment for the disease.

Keep your expectations realistic, live in the present and make room for a reasonable happiness. Appreciate what you have as opposed to what you donít have.
For more information on managing your stress and reclaiming your life read my book, Addicted to Stress: A Woman's 7 Step Program to Reclaim Joy and Spontaneity in Life. To listen to archived radio shows with guest experts visit Turn On Your Inner Light Radio Show




This site needs an editor - click to learn more!

Alzheimers Site @ BellaOnline
View This Article in Regular Layout

Content copyright © 2013 by Debbie Mandel. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Debbie Mandel. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Editor Wanted for details.



| About BellaOnline | Privacy Policy | Advertising | Become an Editor |
Website copyright © 2013 Minerva WebWorks LLC. All rights reserved.


BellaOnline Editor