BellaOnline
g
Beauty & Self
Books & Music
Career
Computers
Education
Family
Food & Wine
Health & Fitness
Hobbies & Crafts
Home & Garden
Money
News & Politics
Relationships
Religion & Spirituality
Sports
Travel & Culture
TV & Movies

dailyclick
Bored? Games!
Nutrition
Postcards
Take a Quiz
Rate My Photo



new
Natural Living
Folklore and Mythology
Baptist
Florida
Cosmetics
Distance Learning
Reading




dailyclick
All times in EST

Clairvoyance: 08:00 PM

Full Schedule
g
g Astronomy Site

BellaOnline's Astronomy Editor

g

June 9 2010 Astronomy Newsletter


Here's the latest article from the Astronomy site at BellaOnline.com.

Pluto
NASA's New Horizons is on its way to visit Pluto, but it has a long way to go yet. Meanwhile here's a profile of dwarf planet 134340 Pluto, largest object in the Kuiper Belt and former planet. It's a lot of titles for something so small.

http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art34315.asp

Following the theme of last week's post on Uranus and Neptune, I should mention that today is the 198th anniversary of the birth of Johann Gottfried Galle (06.09.1812-07.10.1910). He found the planet Neptune using Urbain LeVerrier's prediction.

There is evidence that a number of astronomers had previously seen Neptune, but failed to identify it as a planet. Their number included John Herschel. Now wouldn't that have been a story for both father and son to have discovered new planets!

But yesterday, June 8th, was the 385th anniversary of the birth of Giovanni Cassini (06.09.1625-09.14.1712). He was a highly accomplished astronomer, but is particularly well known for his connection with Saturn. He discovered four of Saturn's moons and also the gap in the rings now called the Cassini Division.

Because of this connection NASA named its Saturn probe after him. The homepage is here http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/ and it's fascinating. The photographs alone could keep you distracted for a long time.

This is one of my favorite pictures of Saturn. Not only is it a stunning picture, but if you look carefully on the left-hand side just outside the brightest-looking rings, there is a little dot. It looks as if it could be one of Saturn's moons, but it's actually the Earth. http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap061016.html

Please visit astronomy.bellaonline.com for even more great content about Astronomy.

To participate in online discussions, this site has a community forum all about Astronomy located here -

http://forums.bellaonline.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=postlist&Board=323

I hope to hear from you sometime soon, either in the forum or in response to this email message. I welcome your feedback!

Do pass this message along to family and friends who might also be interested. Remember it's free and without obligation.

Mona Evans, Astronomy Editor
http://astronomy.bellaonline.com

One of hundreds of sites at BellaOnline.com


Unsubscribe from the Astronomy Newsletter

Online Newsletter Archive for Astronomy Site

Master List of BellaOnline Newsletters



g

For FREE email updates, subscribe to the Astronomy Newsletter

g features
Art on the Moon Fallen Astronaut

Why it took so long to discover Uranus

Moons of Uranus Facts for Kids

Archives | Site Map

forum
Forum
email
Contact

Past Issues
memberscenter

Note: BellaOnline uses cookies to help provide a consistent user experience. Our advertisers may use cookies to help customize ads. Please contact us with any question about our cookie use.



vote
Summertime Foods
Corn on the Cob
Sangria
Burgers on the Grill
Apple Pie



g


| About BellaOnline | Privacy Policy | Advertising | Become an Editor |
Website copyright © 2018 Minerva WebWorks LLC. All rights reserved.


BellaOnline Editor