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BellaOnline's Japanese Food Editor

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January 21 2010 Japanese Food Newsletter


Trying to keep warm during this blustery winter? Why not cook up a donburi dish? Donburi is a deep, porcelain bowl with a lid. It is also a type of dish that features meats and vegetables simmered in a light broth and served on steamed white rice in a covered donburi bowl.

Some people may confuse the American teriyaki rice bowl with donburi dishes, but they are not the same. I explain the difference in the Teriyaki Beef Bowl article. There are lots of donburi dishes. My favorite is Tendon, shrimp tempura donburi.

Enjoy!

Japanese Beef Rice Bowl Gyudon Recipe
Gyudon is a donburi made with thinly sliced beef simmered in a soy sauce broth that is similar to the one used for sukiyaki. In a way, it tastes like sukiyaki on rice.

http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art46854.asp

Oyako Donburi Recipe
This dish represents the mother-child relationship as it features both chicken and egg, simmered together and served on steamed white rice.

http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art51801.asp

Japanese Shrimp Tempura Rice Bowl Tendon Recipe
Tempura fried shrimp served with a flavorful sauce on hot rice is a favorite donburi dish.

http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art46451.asp


Beef or Chicken Teriyaki Bowl Recipe
The teriyaki rice bowl is simply teriyaki-flavored meat on top of rice, an American variation of the Japanese donburi dish. This article explains the difference.

http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art49098.asp


Your Japanese food phrase of the week: Ocha o kudasai. Oh-cha oh koo-dah-sah-ee. This means tea, please. When you are ordering tea in a restaurant, you say this.

If you want anything in a restaurant, you can replace the word for ocha with koohi/coffee, gohan/rice or fooku/fork and end with o kudasai.

Say it politely with a humble smile and you are sure to receive gracious service in return!

I must apologize because there seems to be a glitch with the fonts on the site. Any apostrophes or quotation marks seem to be replaced with some odd symbol. I'm trying to write around the use of these dysfunctional keys.

Until next time,
Chi
Japanese Food editor
BellaOnline.com


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