logo
g
Beauty & Self
Books & Music
Career
Computers
Education
Family
Food & Wine
Health & Fitness
Hobbies & Crafts
Home & Garden
Money
News & Politics
Relationships
Religion & Spirituality
Sports
Travel & Culture
TV & Movies

dailyclick
Bored? Games!
Nutrition
Postcards
Take a Quiz
Rate My Photo

new
Houseplants
Romance Movies
Creativity
Family Travel
Southwest USA
Irish Culture
Home Finance


dailyclick
All times in EST

Full Schedule
g
g Japanese Food Site

BellaOnline's Japanese Food Editor

g

May 30 2010 Japanese Food Newsletter


As an island nation, Japan not surprisingly harvests much of its food from the sea. One of the main ocean harvests is seaweed. Seaweed is a type of marine algae. Of the 10,000 varieties of seaweed, none are poisonous. Most are edible. Coastal and island nations around the world all harvest seaweed as part of their diets. Japan is the highest consumer with a 2 billion dollar seaweed industry. Seaweed is made into countless products from cosmetics to animal feed, but in Asian countries, it is most prized for its culinary use. Some seaweed types are cultivated exclusively in Japan, China and Korea.

Here are two seaweed dishes. One uses hijiki; the other features wakame. Because of seaweed’s major role in Japanese cuisine, I’ll continue to post many seaweed recipes in the future.

Hijiki Nimono Recipe
This is a typical Japanese simmered dish of carrots, aburage (fried tofu) and hijiki seaweed.

http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art67068.asp


Sweet Onion Wakame Salad Recipe
Take the bitter bite out of raw onions by soaking them in cold water. Sweet onions and wakame seaweed make a delicious salad with a sweet-tart miso dressing.

http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art67069.asp


How to Prepare Konbu
Seaweed is perishable, so it often comes dried in long strips. Here is how to prepare konbu for use in recipes.

http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art67080.asp


If you missed one of my earlier articles about nori, or seaweed sheets, do check it out:

How to Choose High Quality Nori Sheets
There are several grades of nori marketed around the world. Good quality nori sheets will make a difference in the taste of your nori dishes. Here is how to spot better quality nori.
http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art64569.asp




***
Your Japanese food word of the week: Pirittokuru (pee-reet-toh-koo-roo) Don’t forget to roll your Rs! This means “pungent, biting” like an onion.


***


We don't see things as they are, we see them as we are. - Anais Nin

Hope you see goodness everywhere.

Until next time…

Kashiko,

Chidori Phillips
BellaOnline.com Japanese Food site editor


Unsubscribe from the Japanese Food Newsletter

Online Newsletter Archive for Japanese Food Site

Master List of BellaOnline Newsletters



g

For FREE email updates, subscribe to the Japanese Food Newsletter

g features
Nabeyaki Udon Recipe

Tori no Kara-age Recipe

Sata Andagi Okinawa Doughnuts Recipe

Archives | Site Map

forum
Forum
email
Contact

Past Issues
memberscenter


vote
Poetry
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Less than Monthly



BellaOnline on Facebook
g


| About BellaOnline | Privacy Policy | Advertising | Become an Editor |
Website copyright © 2014 Minerva WebWorks LLC. All rights reserved.


BellaOnline Editor