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February 10 2007 Painting Newsletter


Hey there, Campers. Hope that you all had a great paint week.
Some tidbits gleaned from readers' and viewers' e-mails this past week:

From Shelly-"Do you know where I could buy dry earth toned powder pigment in Atlanta GA?? I cannot seem to locate it anywhere here!!!"
"Shelly,
Thank you for your e-mail.
I'm not sure where you can buy the powder in the Atlanta area, you can go online to www.pearlpaint.com, and order it from them. You can also try www.dickblick.com and www.starscenic.com.
Hope that helps."

Actually, I am finding that I am ordering online more and more, both for the convenience of not having to run to the art store all the time, but also because it seems that the store that I use never seems to have the one product I need. And the chain stores, like Michael's and Jo Ann's, though well stocked, just do not carry the specialized materials that a decorative painter and muralist needs.
So, if you haven't tried online ordering for your supplies, give it a whirl.

And there was this age old problem from Julie:
"When I was painting my walls, I got paint on the varnished wood trim. How can I get that off?"
"Julie,
Thank you for your e-mail.
If the paint is latex, and the varnished trim is oil based, then you won't have too many problems. Use a mild household solvent like Goof-off or Goo-gone, applied with a small brush or Q-tips, to remove the paint.
If the paint is latex, and is on a water based varnish, you can do the same thing, but very carefully, as you have to be carefull not to start to lift the varnish underneath; you may have to touch up the varnish, should you pull some of it up, too.
If it is oil paint on oil or water based varnish, then the only option is to use a sharp scraper or knife to scrape away the paint, then revarnish.
Hope that helps, and good luck."

I know that we all have had this happen to us, so I'm tossing this out to all of you: What solutions have you come up with? If it is different, and you swear on a stack of worn out paint brushes that it works, send it to me and I'll put it in a future e-mail.

One last thing before I go: I was at the Home Depot the other day, and a viewer came up to me and started talking about a workshop that she had recently attended.
I asked her how she liked it, and if she got any good info from it. (Afterall, isn't that the whole reason for signing up to do a workshop?)
After a moment's hesitation she said yes, there was alot of info, but most of it she didn't understand. I asked what the problem was, and she said that the instructor tended to make any question seem stupid, and that if she couldn't grasp what he was teaching, then she (the student) was in the wrong workshop!
Ouch! Reminded me of my 10th grade Physics teacher (don't ask why I was taking physics; and yes, Sir Issac Newton had been born by then!).
He was brilliant (I guess); but he had no patience with those who could not grasp the brillance of his own utterances. He should not have been teaching, but instead should have been hidden away someplace with only his chalk board and slide rule for company. I'm sure that he would have been happier. And so would I have been.
Workshops are great, and I encourage each and everyone of you to take as many as time and finances will allow; hands-on is the best way to learn.
But not all workshops are equal, and not all artists should be teaching them.
So look, and ask, around. And talk to those who have attended the workshop, to see if the teacher is responsive to questions, and is willing to take the time to walk you through the techniques.
If so, then you will have a great experience.

Have fun this week, and I'll see you at the paint store.
Glenwood






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