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BellaOnline's Tatting Editor

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November 6 2012 Tatting Newsletter


Tatting in the News
Idaho Statesman Jan. 8, 1915
"Tatting Never Fails to Find a Good Market"

Miss Nicholas Finds Same Demand for Lacy Creations As Did Grandmother

One Boise woman has found that to "tat" is quite a comfortable way of making a living. "Tatting" is one of the time honored professions for women, ranking with the spinning wheel, and this dainty fancy work is now as much in vogue as it was 40 years ago.

Miss Emma [sic] Nichols, who does the most exquisite tatting, work which would compare favorably with that of her grandmother's day, says she cannot remember when she learned the art, since she did it at her mother's knee when she was to small to remember.
She now has almost as many orders as she can fill for both the fine and the coarser tatting. The latter she does evenings, when she is through her housework, and makes it into beautiful luncheon sets and centerpieces. The fine tatting, made from 100 thread, has to be done in the daylight. This is used for handkerchiefs, infants layettes and lingerie.
Miss Nicholas also does beautiful handwork, particularly hemming and she is in great demand when trousseaus are needed, to hem the linen or make lingerie or when baby dresses are required.
Speaking of her work, Miss Nicholas said that her prices were so reasonable that she would never get rich from her work, but, as she owns her little home, the money made from her needle work is sufficient for the rest of her needs. She likes it because, having poor health, she is able to rest when she is not feeling well, and then when she feels better, may make up for the lost time. In no other work could she do this, and then too, it is such feminine work that it specially appeals to her.
[Ed's note] I bet Miss Emma would marvel to see all the tatting being sold today on Etsy and Amazon!

Plain Dealer June 20, 1915
"To Launder Tatting"

A good method for successfully laundering tatting is to baste it firmly to a Turkish towel, then wash it as though it were part of the towel, says the Woman's World. When it is almost dry, press it with a hot iron, still on the towel, removing the basting threads and your tatting will be in good condition.

[Ed's note] I seldom recommend pressing tatting with a hot iron. Pin out the lace when still damp and finger press open the picots. Kleenite Denture cleanser works well on spots on the lace.

Plain Dealer Dec. 04, 1921
"To Open Tatting Ring."
When a ring in tatting has been drawn up and you wish to open it again, loosen the last stitch or knot made, pulling out the thread an inch or more, then take hold of the back part of the ring and pull gently but firmly; the ring will open and thus you can undo the work in cases of mistake without breaking the thread. Lillian R.
[Ed's note] In the Online Tatting Class, I explain that to open a closed ring, go back to the last picot made (if there are no picots on the ring, go back one third of the way and go between two double stitches) and slide the double stitches slightly apart so that you can grasp the shuttle core thread , also known as the core thread, foundation thread or the carrying cord, with your shuttle's point, crochet hook or even a hemostat (clamp).
Pull gently on the shuttle core thread until 1/2" - 1" protrudes. Then move back on the ring to the previous picot and pull this slack back; then a third time at the starting point of the ring. Once this small of amount of shuttle core thread is pulled through backwards, you can grasp it and pull it in the normal fashion to enlarge the ring.


Here's the latest article from the Tatting site at BellaOnline.com.

VanDyke Edging by Sudie Sherrod Sudie Sherrod Needlecraft Magazine April 1933 pg. 24 An Especially Pretty Van Dyke Border

http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art14352.asp

Please visit tatting.bellaonline.com for even more great content about Tatting. To participate in free, fun online discussions, this site has a community forum all about Tatting located here -

http://forums.bellaonline.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=postlist&Board=39

I hope to hear from you sometime soon, either in the forum or in response to this email message. I thrive on your feedback! Have fun passing this message along to family and friends, because we all love free knowledge!

Georgia Seitz, Tatting Editor
http://tatting.bellaonline.com

One of hundreds of sites at BellaOnline.com


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