Workbasket July 1928 4 edgings

Workbasket July 1928 4 edgings
Workbasket July 1948 Vol.13 pgs. 12-13
Tatted Handkerchief Edgings

Long gone are the days when we carried lovely embroidered handkerchiefs with dainty tatted lace edgings for every day use. But special occasions call for special hankies. For the bride, the mother of the bride and the mother-in-law, too.

When I began to design tatting patterns and write books I used the hanky edging as a testing ground for my design. Here are three of the earliest ones.

3 hanky designs by G. Seitz '90's

Now when I critique my own work I smile at some of the ways I tatted. But all this helped me to improve and become able to share my work with tatters anywhere.

For example, on the purple upper hanky here, the picots on the rings are too large and fill the open space too much. A little more negative space there would have made them stand out. On the red edging the chain picots are just right, plenty of space between them. The picots sewn to the cloth should have been more regular in size and the same direction in angle to the cloth. But the two side picots on the trefoil are either too loose or too tight and straining across the open space. However, there is no gapsosis! The open space at the bottom of the trefoil is visible and diamond-shaped and very much the same size across.

Oh dear, the variegated purple and yellow edging at the bottom surely does need more work. The picots which are sewn to the cloth are way too long and bunched too tightly. The joining picots of the trefoil are irregular. And the picots joining across the open space are all wiggly and misshapen. Aw...even the picots on the chains are all bent out of shape and either too long, too short, twisted or trying to hide behind their neighbor.

Please bear these things in mind as you tat these three edgings from the Workbasket files posted for BellaOnline.com tatters on Sunday Nov. 03, 2019. These edgings will also be studies in the Online Tatting Class Monday Nov. 04, 2019. The Online Tatting Class is free and all are welcome. Please email for details.

3 hanky designs by Workbasket July 1948 Vol.13 pgs. 12-13



#1 of 3 hanky designs by Workbasket July 1948 Vol.13 pgs. 12-13

Pattern 1 = If there is a pattern that does not match the directions, it has been my habit to tat what I see in the photo or illustration. This was one of those patterns.
R 8 - 8 clr rw. {If attaching lace directly to the cloth, the picot would be a join. Not advised.)
CH 8 - 5 + (join where ring was joined), CH 11 + (join to bottom of first ring.
R 8 - 8 clr rw. {If attaching lace directly to the cloth, the picot would be a join. Not advised.)
CH 8 - 5 + (join where ring was joined), CH 11 + (join to bottom of first ring.

Yes, this does not match. Perhaps we could tat:
*R 8 - 8 clr, R 8 - 8 clr, rw,CH 8 - 5 + (join to p on second ring), CH 5 - 8 rw* repeat.
A second round of chains of 11 ds could be added then.

#2 of 3 hanky designs by Workbasket July 1948 Vol.13 pgs. 12-13

Pattern 2 = Sometimes the old patterns are so blurry it is hard to count the ds.
Chain joins to cloth or make a tatted header.
CH (1 p) x 9, + join to picot etc., leave 1/2" and begin the next chain.
The second round joins a ring to the second, fourth, sixth and eighth picot of the chain.
*R 3 + 3 clr rw, CH 5 - 5, skip next chain and chain 5 + 5 rw and *repeat.

#3 of 3 hanky designs by Workbasket July 1948 Vol.13 pgs. 12-13

As above, make a header or attach to the cloth.
For ease of working, let the first ring be the small 3-3 ring
*R 3 - (or join) 3 clr rw, CH 3 - 3 - 3 - 3 , rw Ring 3 - 3 rw
CH 5 - 5 rw, R 3 + (join to picot of previous chain) 3 clr rw
CH 5 - 5 rw , R 3 + (join to picot of previous chain) 3 clr rw
CH 5 - 5 rw , R 3 + (join to picot of previous chain) 3 clr rw
CH 5 - 5 rw ,
*Repeat
Note that ring 2 will join to the previous motif.




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Content copyright © 2018 by Georgia Seitz. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Georgia Seitz. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Georgia Seitz for details.