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8 Tips to Lower Workplace Stress

We all boil at different points and some of that steam heats up the workplace. Imagine someone who arrives to work irritable about family problems. This co-worker rolls his eyes when you enthusiastically share your project idea or taps his foot impatiently while you speak. Another co-worker walks past you without a greeting or doesn’t listen to you because she is thinking about what’s next on her long list. Consequently, you get into a bad mood.

Bad moods are contagious at the workplace according to research conducted by Dr. Sigal Barsade from the University of Pennsylvania. This is why it is important to not only go green with your physical environment at work, but to green in your work relationships.

Aim for ordinary
The problem is that most of us alternate between two states of mind: feeling like an unimportant person and an ordinary person. An ordinary person knows his identity, separating who he is from what he does - content with simplicity and organizing his day to maximize the positive. In contrast an unimportant person is desperately trying to create a name for himself because he feels that he is not good enough – and of course, this type of person will never feel accomplished and satisfied at work, even when he accomplishes. It helps to remind yourself that you are part of a great team – sometimes it is your turn to shine, other times it is someone else’s.

Try these mood-boosting strategies to lower workplace stress. When you are happy, you pay it forward.
Don’t wait for external circumstances to create peace for you because serenity is inside out.

For more information on managing your stress and reclaiming your life read my book, Addicted to Stress: A Woman's 7 Step Program to Reclaim Joy and Spontaneity in Life. To listen to archived radio shows with guest experts visit Turn On Your Inner Light Radio Show


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Content copyright © 2013 by Debbie Mandel. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Debbie Mandel. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Debbie Mandel for details.



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