German Culture

Francine A. McKenna

Germany is a "Bread Paradise". With over 3050 registered varieties, almost all available types of grain used, from wheat, rye, barley and oats to millet, corn, rice and potato starch. While bread rolls go under so many different names in the various regions it is easier just to point.

Francine A. McKenna

Palm Bouquets, a 10th century German Easter tradition, are Good Luck charms. Made with decorated twigs, herbs and flowers, carried in Palm Sunday processions and blessed in church, then kept for luck or decoration until next Ash Wednesday or added to Easter Sunday Fires. Their story and "How To".

Francine A. McKenna

They are "Harbingers of Spring", bringers of babies, stars of myth, superstition and a theme route. Storks...high on the list of Germany's favorite wildlife, it's "celebration time" when they return to their nests on cliff-ledges, rooftops and chimneys, after wintering in warmer climates.

Francine A. McKenna

Coloring eggs to trim homes, gardens, wells and fountains has been an Easter tradition in German speaking countries for centuries. Easter Markets fill with decorated eggs but it's the custom, and more fun, to "Do it Yourself". Great presents anytime of the year, here's an easy "How To".

Francine A. McKenna

Along with its religious background, the Egg, Rabbit, Goddess Ostara, and of course Chocolate, also star in Germany’s Easter celebrations. A mixture of History, Easter symbols and Pagan and Christian tradition, which makes the country's Easter customs and traditions special.

Francine A. McKenna

Twisting the Rule Book was the name of the game for Medieval monks during Fasts such as Lent, and this 13th century recipe is with chicken breasts rather than the Beaver Tails they used in the middle ages. Fish not Fowl, as living in water they were allowed...and with chicken it is delicious.

Francine A. McKenna

Special beers and secret recipes made sure a Lenten Fast was never all about deprivation for German monks, but their traditions, and fast breaking recipes, soon spread outside monastery walls. Including "Herrgottsbescheisserle" those "Little Cheaters of the Lord", an over sized ravioli.