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BellaOnline's Cacti and Succulents Editor

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Some Stonecrops for Stone Walls

Guest Author - Connie Krochmal

Low growing stonecrops are ideal plants for growing on stone walls. Plant them on top of the walls and in niches between the stones. Here are some great kinds for such places. Most of these are perennials.


Gold moss stonecrop

This plant is also known as wall-pepper since it often grows on walls and among rocks. Native to Europe, this low growing perennial forms a mat. Typically, it is less than four inches in height. The fleshy leaves are triangular with blunt tips. During the early summer, the vivid yellow blooms open in clusters. These are star-shaped. Its other common name, gold moss, refers to the yellow blooms as well as the tiny, moss-like foliage.

Kamschatka stonecrop

Originally native to Japan and Korea, this perennial is less than a foot in height. The stems tend to spread. The toothed foliage is alternate and mostly evergreen. Sporadically throughout the growing season, flower stems will appear with clusters of yellow blossoms. Several cultivars of this plant are available.


Orpine

This vigorous perennial is native to all of Europe. Growing to over 2 feet in height, this has succulent, flattened foliage. Blooming throughout the summer, these blossoms will usually be some shade of purple though they can sometimes be white.


Rock stonecrop

Native to many parts of Europe, this perennial has spreading, low growing stems. In the summer months, the vivid flowers open in pendant clusters.


Showy stonecrop

Reaching about 1 feet in height, this species is noted for its lovely greenish-gray foliage. This is rounded and opposite. The plant is named for its vibrant red flowers. Several cultivars of showy stonecrop are available. In many respects, this resembles Autumn Joy sedum.


Spanish stonecrop

Native to Southeastern Europe, this is mostly grown as an annual. Though it may have a few hairs, typically the leaves and stem will be hairless. The
white blossoms appear in one-sided clusters during early summer. These have pink veins.


Two row stonecrop

Spreading easily, this species is quite vigorous. Growing to about six inches in height, two row stonecrop can form a mat up to two feet across. The flat, toothed succulent leaves are dark green. But they can sometimes become tinged with purple during some parts of the growing season. Beginning in mid-summer, the flowers can range in color from red to white. Typically, these open on colorful red flower stalks.


Thick leaved stonecrop

Native to Southern Europe, this perennial resembles white stonecrop. The opposite leaves can be hairy. It has white blooms that can have tinges of pink.


White stonecrop

Native to Europe, white stonecrop has creeping stems that can become woody. The flower stalks grow to about seven inches or so in height. Though the plant is named for the white flowers, these are sometimes pink in rare cases. They open in large, flat-topped clusters during the summer. Cylindrical shaped, the foliage often has reddish tinges.


Sedum ochroleucum

Native to Southeastern Europe and the Mediterranean region, this perennial reaches about a foot in height. The pointed, linear leaves grow so close together that they overlap. During the summer, the crowded clusters of blossoms open. These are either whitish-yellow or vivid yellow.


Sedum sediforme

Native to Portugal and the Mediterranean, this vigorous perennial reaches nearly two feet in height. It has soft yellow or whitish-green flowers tha
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Content copyright © 2014 by Connie Krochmal . All rights reserved.
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