logo
g Text Version
Beauty & Self
Books & Music
Career
Computers
Education
Family
Food & Wine
Health & Fitness
Hobbies & Crafts
Home & Garden
Money
News & Politics
Relationships
Religion & Spirituality
Sports
Travel & Culture
TV & Movies

dailyclick
Bored? Games!
Nutrition
Postcards
Take a Quiz
Rate My Photo

new
Painting
Heart Disease
Horror Literature
Dating
Hiking & Backpacking
SF/Fantasy Books
Healthy Foods


dailyclick
All times in EST

Full Schedule
g
g Math Site

BellaOnline's Math Editor

g

Converting Improper Fractions and Mixed Numbers


Let’s review types of fractions before discussing subtracting fractions with regrouping.
Fractions are in the form of numerator/denominator.
Mixed numbers consist of a whole number with a fraction such as 4 ½.
Fractions are considered proper fractions when the numerator is smaller than the denominator such as 3/5.
Improper fractions have a numerator larger than the denominator such as 12/5.

Memory Tip:
Here’s a way to remember the difference between proper and improper fractions. The everyday definition of proper means the correct way of doing something. For example, it is proper to eat milk and cereal with a spoon. However it is not proper table manners to slurp your spaghetti. In other words, it is considered improper, or not the correct way. So, it is with fractions. If the numerator is larger than the denominator, I would say with disdain and my nose in the air, “That is an improper fraction and action must be taken immediately! Convert to a mixed number!”

How to Convert an Improper Fraction to a Mixed Number:

Example: 33/7
The line between the 33 and 7 is called the fraction bar. The fraction bar denotes division. So read this number as 33 divided by 7. When you do the division, you get 4 with a remainder of 5.
Thus, 33/7 = 4 5/7. Notice that the denominator stays the same.

What does this really mean? Recall that a fraction is part/whole. 33/7 indicates there are 33 individual parts of equal size and 7 of those parts put together would make a whole or make the picture complete, or make a whole pizza. How many wholes? 4

Practice:
1) 104/33
2) 59/4
3) 87/8

Answers:
1) 3 5/33
2) 14 ¾
3) 10 7/8

How to Convert a Mixed Number to an Improper Fraction:

Example: 4 3/8 = 4 x 8 + 3 / 8 = 35/8
Multiply the whole number and the denominator. Then, add the numerator. The denominator stays the same.

Example: 12 5/6 = 12 x 6 + 5 = 77/6

Application:

If you can change a mixed number into an improper fraction and vice versa, you can subtract fractions that normally require borrowing without doing so.

Example: 7 3/8 – 4 6/8 =

1. It is not possible to subtract 6 from 3. Instead of borrowing one from the whole number, 7, let’s
2. change both fractions into improper fractions --- 59/8 – 38/8
3. subtract ----- 59/8 – 38/8 = 21/8
4. The answer is an improper fraction. Change it into a mixed number.
5. 21/8 = 2 5/8
6. in summary, 7 3/8 – 4 6/8 = 2 5/8

Please remember you can only use this method when the denominators are the same.

In order to master any math skill, practice, practice, practice. Mastering Essential Math Skills: Fractions provides short review fraction exercises for converting fractions and all the other fraction skills. You can read a review of the award winning author, Richard Fisher’s math books for upper elementary and middle school at the link below.
Add +Converting+Improper+Fractions+and++Mixed+Numbers to Twitter Add +Converting+Improper+Fractions+and++Mixed+Numbers to Facebook Add +Converting+Improper+Fractions+and++Mixed+Numbers to MySpace Add +Converting+Improper+Fractions+and++Mixed+Numbers to Del.icio.us Digg +Converting+Improper+Fractions+and++Mixed+Numbers Add +Converting+Improper+Fractions+and++Mixed+Numbers to Yahoo My Web Add +Converting+Improper+Fractions+and++Mixed+Numbers to Google Bookmarks Add +Converting+Improper+Fractions+and++Mixed+Numbers to Stumbleupon Add +Converting+Improper+Fractions+and++Mixed+Numbers to Reddit




Fractions - Adding Unlike Denominators - LCM
Comparing Fractions
Book Review: Mastering Essential Math Skills
RSS
Related Articles
Editor's Picks Articles
Top Ten Articles
Previous Features
Site Map


For FREE email updates, subscribe to the Math Newsletter


Past Issues


print
Printer Friendly
bookmark
Bookmark
tell friend
Tell a Friend
forum
Forum
email
Email Editor


Content copyright © 2013 by Beverly Mackie. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Beverly Mackie. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Beverly Mackie for details.

g


g features
Math MOOC - Free Online Math Courses - Self-Paced

Interactive App for Student Engagement

Free Teaching Math Videos for High School Teachers

Archives | Site Map

forum
Forum
email
Contact

Past Issues
memberscenter


vote
Poetry
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Less than Monthly



BellaOnline on Facebook
g


| About BellaOnline | Privacy Policy | Advertising | Become an Editor |
Website copyright © 2013 Minerva WebWorks LLC. All rights reserved.


BellaOnline Editor