logo
g Text Version
Beauty & Self
Books & Music
Career
Computers
Education
Family
Food & Wine
Health & Fitness
Hobbies & Crafts
Home & Garden
Money
News & Politics
Relationships
Religion & Spirituality
Sports
Travel & Culture
TV & Movies

dailyclick
Bored? Games!
Nutrition
Postcards
Take a Quiz
Rate My Photo

new
Painting
Heart Disease
Horror Literature
Dating
Hiking & Backpacking
SF/Fantasy Books
Healthy Foods


dailyclick
All times in EST

Autism Spectrum Disorders: 4:00 PM

Full Schedule
g
g Quilting Site

BellaOnline's Quilting Editor

g

The Sewing Machine Needle



I was changing my sewing needle on my sewing machine the other day and whilst doing so noticed the unusal shape of the needle. I was thinking that I donít know much about the sewing machine needle, but depend on itís design, strength and durability enormously for a great outcome with my quilts. I got to thinking, which then followed some research and Iíve put together this simple explanation on the design of the sewing machine needle.

This article will become part of a series of articles about the humble needle. This particular article deals with the design of the sewing machine needle and how each individual design element comes together to form the sewing machine needle we know today.

Hereís an illustration of the machine sewing needle side on and front on.


Parts of a Needle:

The SHANK is flat on the back so it can be held firmly in the machine and so it will fit only in the correct position. You cannot insert this needle the wrong way. Styles of needles that have flatter shanks bring the needle closer to the bobbin hook, so that stitches arenít dropped.

The GROOVE on the front of the needle above the eye allows the thread to nestle in the needle as the point pierces the fabric. Without that groove, the hole poked in the fabric would need to be larger in order to accommodate both the thread and the needle.

The SCARF is an area that is scooped out above the eye on the back side of the needle only. This allows the bobbin hook to pass close to the needle and pick up the loop of the thread formed as the needle rises.

The EYE is highly polished, and it should be large enough to surround the thread without squeezing it. If there are burrs in the eye, they will wear away the thread, which passes through the opening many times in the process of forming a stitch. If the eye is not large enough for the thread, the thread will break.

The POINT makes a hole in the fabric for the thread to pass through. Point size and shape and needle size make a difference in stitch quality.
Keep your eye out here for further articles about the humble sewing needle.

Add The+Sewing+Machine+Needle to Twitter Add The+Sewing+Machine+Needle to Facebook Add The+Sewing+Machine+Needle to MySpace Add The+Sewing+Machine+Needle to Del.icio.us Digg The+Sewing+Machine+Needle Add The+Sewing+Machine+Needle to Yahoo My Web Add The+Sewing+Machine+Needle to Google Bookmarks Add The+Sewing+Machine+Needle to Stumbleupon Add The+Sewing+Machine+Needle to Reddit




RSS | Related Articles | Editor's Picks Articles | Top Ten Articles | Previous Features | Site Map


For FREE email updates, subscribe to the Quilting Newsletter


Past Issues


print
Printer Friendly
bookmark
Bookmark
tell friend
Tell a Friend
forum
Forum
email
Email Editor


Content copyright © 2013 by Judie Bellingham. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Judie Bellingham. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Judie Bellingham for details.

g


g features
Uncommonly Corduroy by Stephanie Dunphy

Mother's Day gifts for Quilters

Strip Savvy - Quilt Book Review

Archives | Site Map

forum
Forum
email
Contact

Past Issues
memberscenter


vote
Poetry
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Less than Monthly



BellaOnline on Facebook
g


| About BellaOnline | Privacy Policy | Advertising | Become an Editor |
Website copyright © 2013 Minerva WebWorks LLC. All rights reserved.


BellaOnline Editor