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DIY Salted Eggs


Traditional method of salting eggs uses clay and sea salt mixed together, then placed in clay pots which are buried underground for a certain period depending on how salty you want the eggs to be. You can make your own salted eggs right in your kitchen using a simpler method. Here’s how:

First, use the freshest eggs you could buy or get, whether duck eggs or chicken eggs. Then make ready a clean wide-mouth glass jar that could hold a dozen of eggs and water. You can use smaller jars if a big jar is not available. Just apportion the eggs and salt solution into these smaller jars accordingly.

Prepare salt solution by boiling a mixture of 6 cups of water and 12 cups of coarse salt. Remove from fire and let cool. Place the eggs in the glass jar/s. Pour the cooled salt solution in the jar/s. Weigh down eggs to prevent them from floating. You can use a sealed plastic bag filled with the salt solution, or with a cup or bowl. Cover the jar with perforated paper and keep in a cool, dry place. Leave undisturbed for about 12 days after which you can try one egg to find out if the eggs are salty according to your taste.

Boil the egg, let stand until cooled, open and taste it. If not salty enough, continue soaking for another 5 days. When ready, boil eggs for five minutes (hard-boiled consistency), then let stand for 10 minutes. Soak the eggs longer when using duck eggs. You may opt to dye the eggs with food-grade colorant. The salted eggs, when boiled and cooked properly will keep without refrigeration for about 2 weeks.

Demand and consumption of salted eggs in the Philippines is year round. It is a regular side dish in Filipino tables whether breakfast, lunch or supper. It is normally made into salad with fresh ripe tomatoes and shallots or plainly paired with fried fish.

Salted eggs are a common commodity at the local markets and groceries. Overseas, these are normally sold at Asian stores, therefore, readily available. From time to time though, I make my own salted eggs for two main reasons: I can control the saltiness of the eggs and I am assured that the eggs are fresh. For these reasons alone, doing or making my own salted eggs are worth the effort.
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Content copyright © 2013 by Rachel Meneses-Ponce. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Rachel Meneses-Ponce. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Rachel Meneses-Ponce for details.

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