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Klondike Solitaire

Guest Author - Robin Rounds Whittemore

Klondike is the probably the most well known of all the solitaire games. This game is widely available on computers, but is also still fun to play with a regular deck of cards.

You do need to make sure all 52 cards are in the deck. The loss of one card could definitely spell disaster for any game player. You could never win without all 52 cards.

You'll need room for about 8 columns of cards. Seven will be used for the game play and the other column will be to place the four suits of Aces. The Aces are there to build up in suits from Ace to King.

SETUP:
Deal one card face up and six cards to the right of that one face down. Once a column has a card face up, you start with the next column. So the next column will have a face up card on top of the face down cards. Continue in that manner until the last row has a face up card on it. The remaining cards will be used to play on the layout.

PLAY:
Using the face up cards to start the playing, if there are any Aces; place them in the column you have reserved for the Aces. Example, Ace of spades, followed by the 2, the 3, the 4, etc. For the pile containing the Aces, suits matter. You cannot place a club on a spade or heart.

Any other cards on the game board are played black on red or red on black. The numerical sequence is from highest number to lowest. Example: King, Queen, Jack, 10, 9, etc.

At some point, there may be spaces left in a column when all the cards are used up. A single King or a column with a King starter can be placed in the empty column. ONLY Kings or columns with Kings can be placed in an empty column.

Only face up cards can be played on any other card or column. It need to fit in with the opposite color and descending order sequence.

When you exhaust all card plays from the beginning layout, flip over the remaining cards to try to play on the Aces or the layout. Some people turn the cards up one at a time, and others turn them over three at a time.

WINNING THE GAME:
To fully win the game, all Ace stacks need to be filled from Ace to King of the same suit.

HINTS:
Sometimes when an Ace pile has an Ace and a 2 on it, it is tempting to place the 3 of that suit on the stack. Look around at the other Ace stacks. Could that 3 be placed on an available 4, thereby possibly saving a 2 of another suit to be placed when the Ace shows up?

Look around on your PC. Chances are your computer came with free solitaire games and this could be one of them. They are also many PC games that can be bought and installed very easily if they fit your type of computer. They also offer different card faces and backs that can be changed to suit your mood.

Whether you play on the computer or with a regular deck of cards, this game can help you while away free time.

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Content copyright © 2014 by Robin Rounds Whittemore. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Robin Rounds Whittemore. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact BellaOnline Administration for details.

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