logo
g Text Version
Beauty & Self
Books & Music
Career
Computers
Education
Family
Food & Wine
Health & Fitness
Hobbies & Crafts
Home & Garden
Money
News & Politics
Relationships
Religion & Spirituality
Sports
Travel & Culture
TV & Movies

dailyclick
Bored? Games!
Nutrition
Postcards
Take a Quiz
Rate My Photo

new
European Travel
Action Movies
Bible Basics
Houseplants
Romance Movies
Creativity
Family Travel


dailyclick
All times in EST

Clairvoyance: 08:00 PM

Full Schedule
g
g Card Games Site

BellaOnline's Card Games Editor

g

Whist

Guest Author - Robin Rounds Whittemore

If you have ever played Pitch, you will see how similar Pitch and Whist are; except that there is no bidding in the beginning of Whist. These are the basic rules of Whist. There are many variations of the game.

DEALER:
A dealer is chosen or volunteers and play will start at the left of the dealer. When the dealer deals the cards, after shuffling, he or she looks at the bottom of the deck and announces the suit of that card, not the card itself. That suit is trump for that particular hand. The cards are then cut one last time and the dealer deals thirteen cards to every player, one at a time.


PLAY:
You only need one standard deck of 52 cards. In each suit Ace is high down to the lowest card which is the 2.

The player to the left of the dealer starts first and lays down a card. The highest card of the lead suit wins the trick, unless trump has been played. Then the highest trump wins the trick. The winner of the trick starts the next trick.

Players must play a card of the suit that is led. Let's say Hearts was led and the next player has no Hearts. They can play any card in their hand that they want, or they can try to trump and take the trick.

Let's say trump for this round was Diamonds. If a player lays down a Spade and you have a Spade in your hand, you must play a Spade and not trump with a Diamond.

When all thirteen rounds have been played, any trick taken by a team in excess of six, wins a point. The game continues until one team has a total of seven points.

HINTS:
If your partner has thrown a trump or high card, it is best not to outdo them if you can help it. Example; if he or she leads with a King of Hearts and the only card you have in Hearts is the Ace, you would have to lay it down when it was your turn. When you have to take tricks in excess of six to earn a point, outdoing your partner is the fastest way to lower your chances of winning.

After winning a trick, sometimes it is best to play the lowest card in a non-trump suit to rid yourself of a non-trump suit. This way, if that particular non-trump suit is played, you would be able to play a trump card if you have no other cards of that suit left.

No suit ranks over another in scoring, unless you are talking about the trump suit for the particular hand that is being played.

VARIATIONS:
If a partnership has the Ace, King, Queen, and Jack of the trump suit, they can claim an extra point for their team whether or not they had six or more tricks that round.

To find the trump card, the last card dealt, which would be to the dealer, is turned over and that suit is trump. Understand, that if you play that way, everyone knows at least one card in the dealers hand.

There are Whist players that play until there is a winner at five points.

TRIVIA:
Whist is played more commonly in the UK than in the USA.

Famous people such as Edgar Allan Poe, Queen Victoria, Benjamin Franklin, and even Napoleon were to have said to partake in a game of Whist now and then.



















This site needs an editor - click to learn more!

Add Whist to Twitter Add Whist to Facebook Add Whist to MySpace Add Whist to Del.icio.us Digg Whist Add Whist to Yahoo My Web Add Whist to Google Bookmarks Add Whist to Stumbleupon Add Whist to Reddit




RSS | Related Articles | Editor's Picks Articles | Top Ten Articles | Previous Features | Site Map


For FREE email updates, subscribe to the Card Games Newsletter


Past Issues


print
Printer Friendly
bookmark
Bookmark
tell friend
Tell a Friend
forum
Forum
email
Email Editor


Content copyright © 2014 by Robin Rounds Whittemore. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Robin Rounds Whittemore. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact BellaOnline Administration for details.

g


g features
Cards in the 2000's

Shichi Narabe

Math Card Game

Archives | Site Map

forum
Forum
email
Contact

Past Issues
memberscenter


vote
Poetry
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Less than Monthly



BellaOnline on Facebook
g


| About BellaOnline | Privacy Policy | Advertising | Become an Editor |
Website copyright © 2014 Minerva WebWorks LLC. All rights reserved.


BellaOnline Editor