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Earring Graph Paper



A few people have asked me for graph paper specifically for brick stitched earrings. So I decided to post the graph paper I use. Because not everyone graphs the same way, some people use colored pencils, and some use a graphics program, I saved them both in the grey I use with my patterns usually so black shows up, and in black for the colored pencil users.
One of the first things I do when I print out an earring graph is mark the foundation row, so in this graph paper, I marked the foundation row with little dots.








As you may have noticed, the first two graph styles are bigger then anyone would wear for earrings unless they were made in tiny beads, but you can graph to the size you want. This is the earring pattern for the earrings above.

Trimmed to just the pattern.

At the end of the fringe I used a size 8 bead, followed by 4 seed beads (cylinder beads), then went back up through the 4th bead from the end, and up through the rest of the fringe. When doing fringe with any beads, but especially with cylinder beads like delicas, it's very important to keep the fringe a bit loose so it moves and hangs. What I do is slip my thumbnail of the hand holding the earring between the base and the first bead of the fringe and create a tiny bit of slack that way while I'm making the fringe.
The second styles of graph paper are a type I design in a lot, and I've been asked a few times how to bead them, so I marked the foundation row in the second set to hopefully make it a bit clearer. You can work them either in flat odd count peyote, in which case, you'd ignore the foundation row, and start in the middle and work out to the tips, because it's easier to decrease then to increase, but if you want to do them in brick, you just set the graph sideways, so the foundation row is the long row in the center, you work one side, and then the other. The set divided into sixths is for designing geometric snowflake type patterns.
As always, I'd love to see what you come up with. Come to the forum and show off there!
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Content copyright © 2014 by Shala Kerrigan. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Shala Kerrigan. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Shala Kerrigan for details.

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