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BellaOnline's Attachment Parenting Editor

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Breastfeeding the Adopted Baby

Guest Author - Julie Renee Holland

Attachment parenting is perhaps even more important when you adopt. Whether your baby has come to you hours or months after birth, attachment parenting can help speed the process of building a bond between you and your child. Many adoptive parents want to breastfeed their babies ot give them the best start possible. Some adoptive parents are able to provide full nutritional support for their infants. For most, the goals are more centered on bondign, security and attachment with nutrition taking a secondary role.

The amount of milk an adoptive parent may produce varies widely. You may find that you are able to provide all of your baby's nutritional needs. For most parents it is more realistic to plan on supplying part of the nutrition your baby needs while supplementing breastfeeding with a bottle or lactation assistance device. These devices usually consist of a bag for milk or formula that you can hang around your neck. A thin tube extends to your nipple, allowing the baby to drink even when your supply is not sufficient for all of their needs. These can be obtained through the La Leche League and other sources.

Breastfeeding without giving birth is possible because the hormones necessary for producing milk can be produced through stimulating the breasts or taking medication or supplements. Using an electric breast pump several times a day before the baby arrives is the ideal. This stimulates your body to produce lactation hormones such as prolactin. However many adoptive parents don't know the exact date of arrival for their baby until the baby has already been born.

There are a number of great resources for adoption breastfeeding. The links on the right side of this article are a great place to start. You may also wish to contact your local La Leche League for great advice and support.

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Content copyright © 2013 by Julie Renee Holland. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Julie Renee Holland. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact BellaOnline Administration for details.

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