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Homemade Drying Racks


Drying racks that stack can be fairly expensive, but oh are they ever convenient. To be able to dry multiple batches of washed or dyed fiber or to dry your yarn with absolutely no tension to maximize the bounce. Here is a very simple way to create your very own stackable drying racks. The materials you will need for each level are as follows:

pvc pipe. (it does not have to be a heavy duty type) 1 length 8 long
4 pvc connectors that are configured in a 4-way tee (two openings opposite each other and the other two perpendicular to each other)
12 zip ties
24 square of mesh, muslin, or any breathable fabric (I find that old bed sheets work well for this)
A hacksaw or some other means of cutting the pvc pipe
Sandpaper or a pocket knife
A ruler or tape measure
Work gloves or gardening gloves

To create the frame for the rack cut the pvc pipe into the following lengths: Four 20 pieces and four 4 pieces. If there are any burrs on the pipes from cutting them, they can be removed by sanding them or running the blade of a knife across them until the edges are smooth. Insert the 20 lengths in the openings of the connectors that are at right angles to each other to form a square. Place one 4 pipe in each connector to form a leg. If you want the frame to be permanently fastened, you can use pvc cement at each connection. Personally, I like to be able to disassemble my frames to store them.

For the cloth, mark the center of each side about two inches in from the edge. Also, place a mark 3 inches in from the corner and 2 inches up from the edge. At each mark, cut a small slit for the zip tie to be threaded through. Spread the cloth on a table or other flat surface.

Place the frame, face down, on the cloth and attach it with the zip ties. Do not overly tighten the ties if you want to be able to disassemble the rack.

Now you are wondering why you still have an opening on each fitting. To add another drying rack above of course! This will let you dry lots of fiber or yarn in a very small space. Not to mention, it makes it easy to grab all of the frames at once to bring them in before the rain begins!
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Content copyright © 2014 by Laun Dunn. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Laun Dunn. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Laun Dunn for details.

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