Culture

Mexico
Mexico Information

Burros Diminishing Symbol of Rural Mexican Poverty star
Burros are one of the most enduring symbols of Mexican rural life even though for decades their numbers have been steadily diminishing in many parts of the country. What is the fate of this culturally iconic "beast of burden?"

Cantinflas Mexico's Non-Confrontational Folk Hero star
Have you ever heard of Cantinflas? In Mexico, if you asked that question virtually everybody could proudly tell you who he was. Having starred in over 50 films, a brilliant social satirist, Cantinflas who was often referred to as "Mexico's Charlie Chaplin," has a permanent place in Mexican culture.

Corn Tortilla Presses star
In Mexico, up until the late 1800's, for thousands of years corn tortillas were "hecha a mano"/made by hand. Nowadays, most often, the finest quality tortillas are made with the use of tortilla presses, preferably those made from hardwoods or cast iron.

Day of the Dead in Mexico a Yearly Joyous Reunion star
The Day of the Dead in Mexico is a festive, colorful, and decorative two day celebration in which deceased loved ones are fondly welcomed and remembered. Viewing death as a continuum of life, despite all of the sugar skulls and bread of the dead, nothing is goulish or macabre about it at all.

Metates and Manos Keep on Grinding star
Metates and manos date back over 6000 years ago. These basalt grindstones and "rolling pins" are utilized for such traditional Mexican culinary creations as the dough for tortillas and the finest moles. Although not nearly as commonly used now as in the past, they keep on grinding most effectively!

Mexican Folkloric Dances star
Perhaps the country's most representative and most popular performing art form is Mexican folkloric dancing. Known as bailes regionales, these colorful and highly stylized dance and musical performances are creative expressions of Mexico's ancient and more contemporaneous past.

Mexican Folkloric Dances star
Perhaps the country's most representative and most popular performing art form is Mexican folkloric dancing. Known as bailes regionales, these colorful and highly stylized dance and musical performances are creative expressions of Mexico's ancient and more contemporaneous past.

Mexican Sombreros star
The broad brimmed and high round crowned sombrero, oftentimes intricately embroidered, patterned, and decorated, has become a national and cultural symbol of Mexico. However, would it surprise you to find out that in Mexico a "sombrero" is any style of hat that has a brim?

Mexico's Main Plazas star
No matter what size a Mexican community is, there is normally a main plaza in its downtown's heart. Known by a variety of names like el zocalo, el jardin, or la plaza, these outdoor communal "institutions" are the main gathering place for locals and visitors alike for a multiplicity of purposes.

Pilgrimage to Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe star
Honoring the "Patroness of the America's," Mexico City's Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe is Mexico's most sacred site and is the world's second most visited Catholic shrine. The basilica along with six other churches located around an immense plaza attracts millions of pilgrims per year.

Rebozos a Wearable Utilitarian Folk Art star
Worn by women of all social classes in Mexico, rebozos are more than just colorful woven rectangular garments. They have been called the "indigenous folk art of Mexico" and also referred to as "wearable art." Unfortunately, in many places in Mexico, it is a craft that is in danger of extinction.

The Virgin of Guadalupe Mexico's Cultural Icon star
Mexico is the second largest Catholic country in the world. The most popular and revered religious and cultural image in Mexico is the Virgin of Guadalupe. Transcending the religious domain, affectionately known as La Morenita, she is a symbol of Mexican identity and nationhood.

Tonala the Unadorned Handicrafts Mecca star
Two of Guadalajara's nearby suburbs are nationally and internationally famous for their handicrafts, the upscale, quaint, and charming Tlaquepaque and the physically nondescript and drab Tonala. However, of these two artisan centers, only Tonala could be described as a "mecca" for handicrafts.

Two Cultural Dictums That Oppress Mexican Women star
In Mexico, there are two culturally traditional dictums that serve to limit the potential and opportunities of its residents, especially women. One is QUE DIRAN!/WHAT WOULD PEOPLE SAY! and the other is NO HAGAS COSAS BUENAS QUE PARESCAN MALAS/DO NOT DO GOOD THINGS THAT LOOK BAD.

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