Natural Splendor on the East Coast

Natural Splendor on the East Coast
Natural Splendor on the East Coast
Visit New Brunswick and Nova Scotia

Canada has bragging rights when it comes to having two beautiful coastlines. Either east or west; each offers something spectacular to witness. And each coast has its own unique and colorful history to explore, everything from maritime lore to the home of the beloved Anne of Green Gables author. But easterners are world-famous for their kindness, generosity, and friendliness. All delivered in eastern style and with a welcoming smile.

For travel purposes, here are three key highlights when visiting the region. Keeping in mind that the best season for traveling is mid-May to mid-October, but their hospitality is always heartwarming.

Hopewell Rocks in New Brunswick, situated on the Bay of Fundy, is the best place to witness the miracle that is the world's highest tide. The height of the Fundy tides fluctuates greatly, and varies from 11 ft to 53ft at the Minas Basin .https://www.bayoffundy.com/about/highest-tides/. The Bay of Fundy banks the shores of both New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. Each side is worth the trip.

https://www.thehopewellrocks.ca/index.php/en/home

At Hopewell Rocks, walk along a truly unique stretch of beach. Approximate 1 mile long, at low tide, it’s possible to walk on the sea bed—a perfect time to explore the exposed sandstone formations. The relentless ocean has carved these stones into unusual miniature islands. The tides, influenced by the sun and moon's gravitational pull, work on a six-hour schedule, there is ample time to take in the stunning formations, known as flowerpot rocks, or search for the exposed coves only accessible at low tide. Several of the sandstone formations have cute nicknames: Lover's Arch, Dinosaur Rock, Mother-in-law, and ET.

At high tide, enjoy a kayak trip and see the formations from a different angle. Duck under the arches and come out the other side, richer for the experience. Other enjoyable activities are the woodland trails, offering yet another perspective. While there, investigate the interpretive center and gain insight into the local geology. Or, better yet, enjoy a cup of tea and a conversation with a local.

If it's whale watching you're after, the Bay of Fundy is the place. Rich in marine life, whales migrate to feast in the waters at the mouth of the bay. Each summer and autumn, several species of these beautiful and protected mammals visit. It's an opportune time to spot a minke, humpback, finback, or North Atlantic right whales. https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/species/minke-whale, https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/species/north-atlantic-right-whale
https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/species/fin-whale
https://search.noaa.gov/search?affiliate=www.fisheries.noaa.gov&query=humpback
While out on a whale watching tour, keeping eyes wide open pays dividends as it’s likely to also spot dolphins, seals, sharks, and sea birds like puffins and gannets. Regardless, it will be an unforgettable adventure.

For many visitors, the highlight is undoubtedly linked to a visit to the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic. https://maritimemuseum.novascotia.ca/what-see-do/titanic-unsinkable-ship-and-halifax. It's always an emotional experience to revisit the history of the unsinkable Titanic. Halifax has seen its share of travesty and played a crucial role in the heroic search for survivors lost in the cold Atlantic in 1912. Rescue efforts located 328 bodies, of whom 150 were laid to rest in the Halifax cemeteries. Many floating artifacts were salvaged from the freezing waters and still draw a crowd. The harrowing tale is recorded for all eternity. Displayed in the museum are items like a deck chair, life jacket fragments, a glove, and a heartwrenching set of children's shoes. In 2007, the result of DNA tests identified the shoes as those of Sidney Leslie Goodwin, a 19-month-old toddler from England. The Goodwin family was en route to start a new life in Niagara Falls when the entire family perished. To top it off, Halifax is a picturesque city.

These two Canadian provinces, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia are small in landmass but mighty grand in heart. While visiting, remember to indulge in a seafood bonanza of clams, periwinkles, mussels, scallops, chowder, lobster, and crab. If your visit coincides with early spring, try fiddleheads as a side dish. I won't tell you what they are. Hint: rich in fatty acids omega 3 & 6, a powerful antioxidant, loaded with beneficial iron and fiber, and they taste delicious.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiddlehead_fern

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Content copyright © 2019 by Monika R. Martyn. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Monika R. Martyn. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Monika R. Martyn for details.