logo
g Text Version
Beauty & Self
Books & Music
Career
Computers
Education
Family
Food & Wine
Health & Fitness
Hobbies & Crafts
Home & Garden
Money
News & Politics
Relationships
Religion & Spirituality
Sports
Travel & Culture
TV & Movies

dailyclick
Bored? Games!
Nutrition
Postcards
Take a Quiz
Rate My Photo

new
European Travel
Action Movies
Bible Basics
Houseplants
Romance Movies
Creativity
Family Travel


dailyclick
All times in EST

Full Schedule
g
g Women's Lit Site

BellaOnline's Women's Lit Editor

g

The Lie - Book Review


The Lie by Fredrica Wagman was hard to get into at first. In fact, I had to reread the first 2 chapters twice to grasp the writing style of the author as I haven't read another book like it before that I can remember! The Lie turned out to be was interesting and different.

The story begins with Ramona, the main character, sitting on a park bench contemplating the death of her father. She begins talking to the stranger sitting next to her for hours about everything and nothing in particular. Immediately, Ramona's quirky personality emerges and you become engrossed in her troubled mind. She takes home the stranger on the park bench mostly because she is enthralled with his fingers of all things. Ramona describes them "...each shocking finger round and wide at the base, but instead of it getting slightly narrower as it progressed like most fingers do, it kept all its far round wideness all the way up to the nail where there was a certain unusual thickening...a rather bulbous thickening you might say all around the nail head itself, so that each finger looked exactly like a penis...and there were ten of them...ten perfect penis fingers...I couldn't take my eyes away."

After only a brief period of knowing him she takes him home to meet her mother and they have none stop sex for 4 days. These events lead to what seems her instability in her mind. The story unfolds of her abuse from her father and her mother. She has a hard time dealing with his death because she feels like so much was left unsaid and undone. Her mother has a mental problem that makes Ramona feel as if she has to take the abuse from her mother. The stranger whom she later marries has a high sex drive which causes emotional distress for Ramona. Ramona's obsession with Rita Hayworth adds a nice twist to the novel as well! The way Fredrica writes is almost like looking into the mind of a person with a severe depressive disorder.

The Lie turned out to be better then I first thought it would be. I would recommend reading it at a time when you can't be distracted so you can fall into the life and mind of Ramona.


Add The+Lie+%2D+Book+Review to Twitter Add The+Lie+%2D+Book+Review to Facebook Add The+Lie+%2D+Book+Review to MySpace Add The+Lie+%2D+Book+Review to Del.icio.us Digg The+Lie+%2D+Book+Review Add The+Lie+%2D+Book+Review to Yahoo My Web Add The+Lie+%2D+Book+Review to Google Bookmarks Add The+Lie+%2D+Book+Review to Stumbleupon Add The+Lie+%2D+Book+Review to Reddit




Fredrica Wagman Official
RSS
Related Articles
Editor's Picks Articles
Top Ten Articles
Previous Features
Site Map


For FREE email updates, subscribe to the Women's Lit Newsletter


Past Issues


print
Printer Friendly
bookmark
Bookmark
tell friend
Tell a Friend
forum
Forum
email
Email Editor


Content copyright © 2014 by Jeanette Stingley. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Jeanette Stingley. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Jeanette Stingley for details.

g


g features
A Shadow of a Smile Book Review

Holiday Shopping for a Book Lover

Dancing in the Moonlight Book Review

Archives | Site Map

forum
Forum
email
Contact

Past Issues
memberscenter


vote
Poetry
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Less than Monthly



BellaOnline on Facebook
g


| About BellaOnline | Privacy Policy | Advertising | Become an Editor |
Website copyright © 2014 Minerva WebWorks LLC. All rights reserved.


BellaOnline Editor