Miss Beller's Van Dyke Edging 1916

Miss Beller's Van Dyke Edging 1916
Tatted Edging Always in Demand by Miss Olive Beller
as published in the May 07, 1916 The Plain Dealer

Described in the 1916 article as a “Van Dyke Edging,” the pattern uses three familiar designs in a “new” arrangement. There is a round center wheel bordered in a point by a ring and chain repeating edging and both these elements are depended from a header of two opposing lines of only rings. The two lines of the header would also allow for the introduction of a ribbon down the center. Using the ribbon as a fastener, this lace could be used as a removable collar also.

Center Wheel
R of 7 picots separated by double stitches; clr and make mock 8th picot .
R1 4 - 2 - 2 - 2 - 2 - 4 clr dnrw. Make a shuttle lock join to the next open picot.
R 4 + 2 - 2 - 2 - 2 - 4 clr dnrw. Repeat around.

Point Edging
R 4 - 2 - 2 - 2 - 2 - 4 clr rw
CH 4 - 2 - 2 - 2 - 2 - 4 rw
*R 4 + 2 - 2 - 2 - 2 - 4 clr rw
Repeat from * 3 more times.
CH 4 - 2 - 2 - 2 - 2 - 4 rw

At the point, the next 3 rings are short 1 picot.
R 4 + 2 - 2 - 4 clr rw
CH 4 - 2 - 2 - 2 - 2 - 4 rw
R 4 - 2 + 2 - 2 - 4 clr rw2
CH 4 - 2 - 2 - 2 - 2 - 4 rw
R 4 + 2 - 2 - 4 clr rw
CH 4 - 2 - 2 - 2 - 2 - 4 rw

Header of all rings (1 shuttle/needle)
The first ring has picot, repeats join.
R 4 + 2 - 2 - 2 - 2 - 4 clr rw
Leave ¼” bare thread space.
R 4 - 4 clr rw
Leave ¼” bare thread space (dotted lines.)
R 4 + 2 - 2 - 2 - 2 - 4 clr rw
Leave ¼” bare thread space.
R 4 + (join to previous small ring) 4 clr rw
Repeat set.

On opposite side the four small rings join at center.

diagram of VanDyke edging by Olive Beller 1916

Any element may be tatted first. Once the length is determined, tatting a number of wheels in advance would be handy but plan ahead. It requires 8 rings from the header to form attachments for both the side edging and wheel. Counting from the left edge, the third, fourth and fifth rings are attached to the wheel. Neither ring two nor ring six attach to the wheel nor to the edging. The edging attaches to ring one and to ring seven. Ring eight is the dividing spot between points.

The original directions were to finish the second side of the edging and attach it to the header the make another ring “ close to the last one, without joining, after which proceed as before. But there is no mention of a chain to that ring nor after that ring. The illustration did not show that spot unfortunately. An unjoined ring is going to flop about. Consider a ring which joins to the eight ring. Tat a chain as before, rw, small ring (4 + 4), rw chain as before. Begin next point repeat. This edging also joins to the wheel in four positions. These joins are mirror images to each other.

If the wheels are prepared first, then the pointed edging may be attached to them as the edging is tatted. If the extra small ring and the two chains are used as a separator between points, then a long length of this maybe tatted in one pass. As you tat the header, join it to the both the edging and the wheel as noted.

Notes:
1. Consider placing a floss thread or helping loop here to hide the tail at the end.
2. To enhance the look of a “point,” consider adding a small ring pointing outward here.

"Van Dyke"? Lace with points such as this one is often referred to as "Van Dyke" style. This comes from the lace ruffs with deep V-shaped points which can be seen on both mal
See his portrait of King Charles 1,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:King_Charles_I_by_Antoon_van_Dyck.jpg
The famous "Blue Boy" painting by Thomas Gainsborough(1727 – 1788) also shows the lace points.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Thomas_Gainsborough_008.jpg




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