logo
g Text Version
Beauty & Self
Books & Music
Career
Computers
Education
Family
Food & Wine
Health & Fitness
Hobbies & Crafts
Home & Garden
Money
News & Politics
Relationships
Religion & Spirituality
Sports
Travel & Culture
TV & Movies

dailyclick
Bored? Games!
Nutrition
Postcards
Take a Quiz
Rate My Photo

new
Baptist
Florida
Cosmetics
Distance Learning
Reading
Crochet
Marriage


dailyclick
All times in EST

Full Schedule
g
g Museums Site

BellaOnline's Museums Editor

g

Museum Visitation Factors


This is the second in a series of articles examining how and why people visit museums.

When deciding how to spend their leisure time, museum visitors consider many factors, consciously or unconsciously, as described by John Howard Falk and Lynn Diane Dierking in their book The Museum Experience. Some of these issues are within your control, while others are not.

Cost/Benefit Analysis. Admission to most museums is relatively affordable for most demographics. Lower income groups have less discretionary income and are less likely to visit a museum, even though the perceived benefit may exist among those groups. Unless a museum is very large and/or government funded (ie: The Smithsonian, The Cleveland Museum of Art), no admission or low admission implies a lower value experience.

Convenience. People will ask themselves the following questions:

Is it easy to get to?
Is it in an unfamiliar or unsafe area?
Will there be traffic?
Is there adequate parking?
Is there food available on site or nearby?
What is the weather going to do?

Social-Recreation Reasons. Visitors who best identify with this thought process will come to a museum for amusement, fun, recreation, or opportunity to socialize.

Educational Reasons. Visitors do not generally say they visit museums “to learn.” Although learning is a primary reason to visit a museum, it is often seen more in terms of satisfying curiosity or exploring an idea/topic/theme. Within the family group, however, education is often seen as a reason to visit. One survey conducted at the Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village cited the educational benefit for children as a primary reason for visiting.

Reverential Reasons. A unique or unusual museum display or subject can be a draw for visitors. People may ask themselves, “Is this such a rare opportunity that one absolutely cannot miss the chance to see it or do it?” Reverential reasons can also be compared to a “religious experience.” From its inception, the museum has had the feeling of going to a “temple” or sacred space. Certain historic sites or artifacts themselves can create an innate desire to see them, such as the battlefield at Gettysburg, the Mona Lisa, the Sistine Chapel, King Tut, etc.


Add Museum+Visitation+Factors to Twitter Add Museum+Visitation+Factors to Facebook Add Museum+Visitation+Factors to MySpace Add Museum+Visitation+Factors to Del.icio.us Digg Museum+Visitation+Factors Add Museum+Visitation+Factors to Yahoo My Web Add Museum+Visitation+Factors to Google Bookmarks Add Museum+Visitation+Factors to Stumbleupon Add Museum+Visitation+Factors to Reddit




Why Do People Visit Museums?
Museum Collaborations
Marketing Ideas for Small Museums
RSS
Related Articles
Editor's Picks Articles
Top Ten Articles
Previous Features
Site Map




For FREE email updates, subscribe to the Museums Newsletter


Past Issues


print
Printer Friendly
bookmark
Bookmark
tell friend
Tell a Friend
forum
Forum
email
Email Editor


Content copyright © 2015 by Kim Kenney. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Kim Kenney. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Kim Kenney for details.

g


g features
Who Visits a Museum?

Why Do People Visit Museums?

The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library & Museum

Archives | Site Map

forum
Forum
email
Contact

Past Issues
memberscenter


vote
Poetry
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Less than Monthly



BellaOnline on Facebook
g


| About BellaOnline | Privacy Policy | Advertising | Become an Editor |
Website copyright © 2016 Minerva WebWorks LLC. All rights reserved.


BellaOnline Editor