logo
g Text Version
Beauty & Self
Books & Music
Career
Computers
Education
Family
Food & Wine
Health & Fitness
Hobbies & Crafts
Home & Garden
Money
News & Politics
Relationships
Religion & Spirituality
Sports
Travel & Culture
TV & Movies

dailyclick
Bored? Games!
Nutrition
Postcards
Take a Quiz
Rate My Photo

new
Romance Movies
Creativity
Family Travel
Southwest USA
Irish Culture
Home Finance
Comedy Movies


dailyclick
All times in EST

Low Carb: 8:00 PM

Full Schedule
g
g Baby Names Site

BellaOnline's Baby Names Editor

g

How to Pronounce Baby Names

Guest Author - Nancy Man

Ever wonder how to pronounce a particular baby name? Me too--certain names are hard to sound out, at first glance. So I put together a cheat sheet of ten tricky names that you may encounter one day (if you haven't already)...

Aloysius
The "si" makes an sh-sound, and the stress is on the third syllable, so the pronunciation becomes al-o-ISH-us.

Bjork
The "j" in this Scandinavian name makes a "y" sound, and the whole thing rhymes with the word work: BYERK. (In Iceland, the "o" would have an umlaut; in Norwegian, it would have a slash.)

Dieter
Nope, it has nothing to do with dieting...in this German name, the "ie" makes an ee-sound, and the pronunciation is therefore DEET-er.

Etienne
This French version of Stephen is pronounced with a stress is on the second syllable: ay-TYEN. (That first E should actually be topped by an acute accent mark.)

Eoghan
This is an Anglicized (and probably more familiar) form of the Celtic name Ewan, and it's said YO-in.

Francesca
In Italian names, "c" followed by "e" or "i" is pronounced with a ch-sound: fran-CHESS-ka. Same thing goes for the male equivalent Francesco, and for other Italian words (like Ciao).

Guillaume
Here's another French name--this French version of William is pronounced gee-OM.

Llywelyn
The Welsh name Llywelyn is approximately pronounced lle-WEL-in, but to make that ll-sound, you curl the sides of your tongue upward and blow out. The sound is something of a hiss that falls in between an L and an H.

Niamh
This Irish name has just one syllable, and the "mh" makes a v-sound: NEEV. In many Irish names (and Irish words generally), the letter H isn't a letter so much as a symbol that changes the sounds of other consonants.

Stanislaw
This Polish name is said stah-NEE-swahf. The L, which should actually have a slash through it, is pronounced like a W.
This site needs an editor - click to learn more!

Add How+to+Pronounce+Baby+Names to Twitter Add How+to+Pronounce+Baby+Names to Facebook Add How+to+Pronounce+Baby+Names to MySpace Add How+to+Pronounce+Baby+Names to Del.icio.us Digg How+to+Pronounce+Baby+Names Add How+to+Pronounce+Baby+Names to Yahoo My Web Add How+to+Pronounce+Baby+Names to Google Bookmarks Add How+to+Pronounce+Baby+Names to Stumbleupon Add How+to+Pronounce+Baby+Names to Reddit




Tree Names as Baby Names
Baby Names from Literature
RSS
Related Articles
Editor's Picks Articles
Top Ten Articles
Previous Features
Site Map


For FREE email updates, subscribe to the Baby Names Newsletter


Past Issues


print
Printer Friendly
bookmark
Bookmark
tell friend
Tell a Friend
forum
Forum
email
Email Editor


Content copyright © 2014 by Nancy Man. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Nancy Man. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact BellaOnline Administration for details.

g


g features
Baby Names That Age Well

Using Nicknames as Baby Names

Celebrity Baby Names of 2011

Archives | Site Map

forum
Forum
email
Contact

Past Issues
memberscenter


vote
Poetry
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Less than Monthly



BellaOnline on Facebook
g


| About BellaOnline | Privacy Policy | Advertising | Become an Editor |
Website copyright © 2014 Minerva WebWorks LLC. All rights reserved.


BellaOnline Editor