logo
g Text Version
Beauty & Self
Books & Music
Career
Computers
Education
Family
Food & Wine
Health & Fitness
Hobbies & Crafts
Home & Garden
Money
News & Politics
Relationships
Religion & Spirituality
Sports
Travel & Culture
TV & Movies

dailyclick
Bored? Games!
Nutrition
Postcards
Take a Quiz
Rate My Photo

new
Painting
Heart Disease
Horror Literature
Dating
Hiking & Backpacking
SF/Fantasy Books
Healthy Foods


dailyclick
All times in EST

Full Schedule
g
g Tatting Site

BellaOnline's Tatting Editor

g

Josephine Knot (Ring)


Josephine Knots/Rings



The First Half Stitch = French Stitch






The Second Half Stitch = English Stitch

Graphics by Mark Myers aka Tatman




The Josephine Knot/Ring, says Elgiva Nicholls in "Tatting Techniques", was named for the Empress Josephine, Napoleon's consort, and was found often in early French patterns. Rebecca Jones in her "The Complete Book of Tatting" also calls this element the Josephine "Knot." It has also been designated a Josephine Ring in many publications and a Josephine Picot in Therese de Dillmont's "Encyclopaedia of Needlework."



In Barbour's Prize Needlework Series - A Treatise on Lace-Making, Embroidery and Needle Work, Book #1, pg. 74, this stitch is referred to as the "Empress Knot"... Empress Joséphine de Beauharnais, 1763 - 1814, first wife of Napoleon Bonaparte.



Here we will designate this element as theJosephine Ring

In the Mlle Riego patterns, her designations for the stitches were:

single stitch = English stitch = today's second half stitch

reverse stitch = French stitch = today's first half stitch



It is noted that Mlle Reigo began her patterns with what we call the second half stitch today and the antique patterns do show this difference if examined closely.


Note that when 8-10 stitches are completed, the twist but may not yet be immediately visible in Josephine Rings of less than 10 half stitches. See rings C above. These rings clearly show the twisting that occurs in the Josephine Ring.

Working just one half stitch when making a chain creates a "twisted", or "rickrack" style chain. Working both half stitches in sets, i.e. 4 French / 4 English or 4 first half stitch followed by 4 second half stitch creates "Victorian sets", rick-rack tatting, zig-zag tatting or the node stitch. The Josephine Ring may be added to any chain pattern to add interest. It may also be thrown off as a floating ring when working a self-closing mock ring.
Add Josephine+Knot+%28Ring%29 to Twitter Add Josephine+Knot+%28Ring%29 to Facebook Add Josephine+Knot+%28Ring%29 to MySpace Add Josephine+Knot+%28Ring%29 to Del.icio.us Digg Josephine+Knot+%28Ring%29 Add Josephine+Knot+%28Ring%29 to Yahoo My Web Add Josephine+Knot+%28Ring%29 to Google Bookmarks Add Josephine+Knot+%28Ring%29 to Stumbleupon Add Josephine+Knot+%28Ring%29 to Reddit




Vintage Patterns
Building a Tatting Library - Standards
RSS
Related Articles
Editor's Picks Articles
Top Ten Articles
Previous Features
Site Map


For FREE email updates, subscribe to the Tatting Newsletter


Past Issues


print
Printer Friendly
bookmark
Bookmark
tell friend
Tell a Friend
forum
Forum
email
Email Editor


Content copyright © 2013 by Georgia Seitz. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Georgia Seitz. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Georgia Seitz for details.

g


g features
Bridge Set Heart

Bridge Set - Diamond

Diamond Pattern revised Sue Duckles

Archives | Site Map

forum
Forum
email
Contact

Past Issues
memberscenter


vote
Poetry
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Less than Monthly



BellaOnline on Facebook
g


| About BellaOnline | Privacy Policy | Advertising | Become an Editor |
Website copyright © 2013 Minerva WebWorks LLC. All rights reserved.


BellaOnline Editor