logo
g Text Version
Beauty & Self
Books & Music
Career
Computers
Education
Family
Food & Wine
Health & Fitness
Hobbies & Crafts
Home & Garden
Money
News & Politics
Relationships
Religion & Spirituality
Sports
Travel & Culture
TV & Movies

dailyclick
Bored? Games!
Nutrition
Postcards
Take a Quiz
Rate My Photo

new
Houseplants
Romance Movies
Creativity
Family Travel
Southwest USA
Irish Culture
Home Finance


dailyclick
All times in EST

Full Schedule
g
g Hair Site

BellaOnline's Hair Editor

g

Leila's Hair Museum

Guest Author - Lynne Chapman

In Independence, MO there is a museum that may be one of its kind in the United States. It is a hair museum. You won’t find an assortment of hairstyles, as you might expect. Leila Cohoon’s museum houses over 2,000 pieces of jewelry containing or made of human hair and 300 hair wreaths.

That’s right, every piece is either made of locks of hair or contains human hair. Visitors touring the museum will see Leila’s most unusual piece, a hatpin made of blonde and brown hair, in the form of woven hair to be worn over your own hair and the oldest piece of hair art, a brooch made in 1680. There are Sepia brooches from the 1700s containing scenes were painted with paint mixed with pulverized hair.

Leila has always been intrigued by hair. She began a as a hairdresser in 1949, opened her own salon in 1956 and the Independence College of Cosmetology in 1960. It was in 1956 that she found her first piece of hair art. With her second piece, the hobby became an obsession. Now her deepest desire is to collect every piece of hair art she can find to preserve it for future generations.

The museum is a labor of love for Leila, who considers each piece special. She says,
”The hair in each piece came from a person who lived on this earth at one time and the hair is the only part of that person that is still here. I feel very special that I am the chosen one who is the keeper of that person’s hair.”


Mrs. Cohoon discovered the steps in making wreaths by taking one apart and putting it back together. Now she is passing the art on to future generations by writing a book on the directions of how hair wreaths were made. A second book is for teachers to share with young children. She suggests that children learn how to preserve pieces of their parents’ and sibling’s hair. In doing so they can also learn about families DNA. A third book will be called Hair/Genealogy and have pictures of the 300 wreaths along with the family history of each one.

This fascinating museum is located at 1333 S. Noland Road, Independence, MO. The website is here: Leila’s Hair Museum
This site needs an editor - click to learn more!

Add Leila%27s+Hair+Museum to Twitter Add Leila%27s+Hair+Museum to Facebook Add Leila%27s+Hair+Museum to MySpace Add Leila%27s+Hair+Museum to Del.icio.us Digg Leila%27s+Hair+Museum Add Leila%27s+Hair+Museum to Yahoo My Web Add Leila%27s+Hair+Museum to Google Bookmarks Add Leila%27s+Hair+Museum to Stumbleupon Add Leila%27s+Hair+Museum to Reddit




What to do in uncomfortable salon situations.
Shear Paradise Salon in Las Vegas
Cuts by the Green Salon
RSS
Related Articles
Editor's Picks Articles
Top Ten Articles
Previous Features
Site Map


For FREE email updates, subscribe to the Hair Newsletter


Past Issues


print
Printer Friendly
bookmark
Bookmark
tell friend
Tell a Friend
forum
Forum
email
Email Editor


Content copyright © 2014 by Lynne Chapman. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Lynne Chapman. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact BellaOnline Administration for details.

g


g features
Archives | Site Map

forum
Forum
email
Contact

Past Issues
memberscenter


vote
Poetry
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Less than Monthly



BellaOnline on Facebook
g


| About BellaOnline | Privacy Policy | Advertising | Become an Editor |
Website copyright © 2014 Minerva WebWorks LLC. All rights reserved.


BellaOnline Editor