logo
g Text Version
Beauty & Self
Books & Music
Career
Computers
Education
Family
Food & Wine
Health & Fitness
Hobbies & Crafts
Home & Garden
Money
News & Politics
Relationships
Religion & Spirituality
Sports
Travel & Culture
TV & Movies

dailyclick
Bored? Games!
Nutrition
Postcards
Take a Quiz
Rate My Photo

new
Bible Basics
Houseplants
Romance Movies
Creativity
Family Travel
Southwest USA
Irish Culture


dailyclick
All times in EST

Full Schedule
g
g Chinese Culture Site

BellaOnline's Chinese Culture Editor

g

Yin-Yang Cookies Recipe

Guest Author - Heather J. Hasan

I baked these for the Chinese New Year after finding the recipe in a local news paper. They are so scrumptious that I have decided to share this recipe with you, my readers, in hopes that you will enjoy them as much as my family and I have.

The recipe takes some time and effort but the end product is delicious and worth the work.

Vanilla Dough:
½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, at room temperature
¾ cup sugar
1 large egg
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 1/3 cups plus 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon cream of tartar
½ teaspoon baking soda
¼ teaspoon salt

Chocolate Dough:
½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, at room temperature
¾ cup sugar
1 large egg
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon all-purpose flour
1/3 cup natural cocoa powder (I used Hershey’s Cocoa Powder)
½ teaspoon baking soda
¼ teaspoon salt

Decorations:
½ cup white chocolate chips
½ cup bittersweet chocolate chips

To prepare vanilla dough:
Combine the butter and sugar in a large mixing bowl and use an electric mixer to beat until fluffy and smooth, about 5 minutes. Beat in the egg and vanilla extract.
In a medium bowl, sift or whisk together the flour, cream of tartar, baking soda, and salt. Gradually add dry ingredients to the butter and sugar mixture, using a spoon or an electric mixer with a paddle attachment to form stiff dough. Set aside.

To prepare the chocolate dough:
In a second large mixing bowl, combine butter and sugar using an electric mixer to beat until fluffy and smooth, about 5 minutes. Beat in the egg and vanilla extract.
In a medium bowl, sift or whisk together the flour, cocoa powder, baking soda, and salt. Gradually add dry ingredients to the butter and sugar mixture, using a spoon or an electric mixer with a paddle attachment to form a stiff dough.

Preparation for baking:
Cover both batches of dough with plastic wrap and refrigerate for about 2 hours or until firm enough to shape.
Divide each batch of dough in half. Shape each half of the vanilla dough in a log with a 1 ½ inch diameter and 8 to 9 inches long. Roll it in a piece of wax paper on the counter will help make it smooth.
Using your thumbs, make an indention along one long side of the long to create an apostrophe shape. Wrap in plastic and refrigerate. Repeat the process with the chocolate dough.
Remove vanilla dough from refrigerator and unwrap one piece. Invert vanilla dough into one of the chocolate ones to create a round, interlocking yin-yang log. Roll a few times to ensure they adhere.
Repeat the process with the remaining logs. Wrap in plastic and refrigerate for at least 3 hours and up to overnight. The dough can also be frozen.

Baking:
When ready to bake, preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.
Using a serrated knife, cut the cookie dough into 1/4 –inch thick disks and arrange them about 1 ½ inches apart on the pan. Invert one white chocolate chip in the chocolate half of each cookie and a chocolate chip in the vanilla half.
Bake for 8 to 10 minutes, or until cookies have spread, puffed, and begun to brown around the edges. Let them cool on the pans 5 to 10 minutes Transfer cookies to a wire rack to cool completely. Repeat with the remaining dough.

Store in airtight container at room temp for up to a week or freeze up to one month.

And there you have it! These cookies are excellent for any Chinese-themed party/celebration or whenever you are in the mood for something yummy.

-Reprinted from the Columbus Dispatch in Columbus, Ohio.
Add Yin%2DYang+Cookies+Recipe to Twitter Add Yin%2DYang+Cookies+Recipe to Facebook Add Yin%2DYang+Cookies+Recipe to MySpace Add Yin%2DYang+Cookies+Recipe to Del.icio.us Digg Yin%2DYang+Cookies+Recipe Add Yin%2DYang+Cookies+Recipe to Yahoo My Web Add Yin%2DYang+Cookies+Recipe to Google Bookmarks Add Yin%2DYang+Cookies+Recipe to Stumbleupon Add Yin%2DYang+Cookies+Recipe to Reddit




RSS | Related Articles | Editor's Picks Articles | Top Ten Articles | Previous Features | Site Map


For FREE email updates, subscribe to the Chinese Culture Newsletter


Past Issues


print
Printer Friendly
bookmark
Bookmark
tell friend
Tell a Friend
forum
Forum
email
Email Editor


Content copyright © 2014 by Heather J. Hasan. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Heather J. Hasan. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Inci Yilmazli for details.

g


g features
Owls in Chinese Culture

Chinese Valentine's Day

Book Review: Chinese Calligraphy Made Easy

Archives | Site Map

forum
Forum
email
Contact

Past Issues
memberscenter


vote
Poetry
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Less than Monthly



BellaOnline on Facebook
g


| About BellaOnline | Privacy Policy | Advertising | Become an Editor |
Website copyright © 2014 Minerva WebWorks LLC. All rights reserved.


BellaOnline Editor