logo
g Text Version
Beauty & Self
Books & Music
Career
Computers
Education
Family
Food & Wine
Health & Fitness
Hobbies & Crafts
Home & Garden
Money
News & Politics
Relationships
Religion & Spirituality
Sports
Travel & Culture
TV & Movies

dailyclick
Bored? Games!
Nutrition
Postcards
Take a Quiz
Rate My Photo

new
Action Movies
Bible Basics
Houseplants
Romance Movies
Creativity
Family Travel
Southwest USA


dailyclick
All times in EST

Clairvoyance: 08:00 PM

Full Schedule
g
g Rugmaking Site

BellaOnline's Rugmaking Editor

g

New Material and New Design for a Round Rug

Guest Author - Iris ten Holder

It's fun to shop around for new yarns and materials and get new ideas.

Take the opportunity when you see something new and unusual to experiment and adapt a design.

Some yarns may not be advertised for knitting. For example, those who do macramé will be familiar with burlap or jute cord, but as knitter one may be a bit wary of using such coarse and hard material. I advise you to take the plunge. Even though the material is unyielding, and takes extra effort, the result is worth it.

Jute is the fabric used in burlap. It can come in many sizes and twists. It is often in natural colors, but is also died. I happened to come across a deep golden burlap yarn, wound in skeins. The yarn was the size of thick wool, the wool I might use for knitted rugs. I decided to be adventurous and give it a try.

It was obvious that this was a different kettle of fish. There was just the one color, so my usual playing with shading, contrast or other color choices would not apply. This was going to be a one-color rug. I realized I would have to do something different to make it a bit more interesting. I made small change, and started knitting.

Generally my knit rugs employ just the knitting stitch and not the purl stitch, the one usually worked on the return needle, which causes the typical v shaped stitches to be on one side, leaving a smooth surface, while the other side has a bubbly effect. When one uses the knitting stitch on both sides, the result is a coarse rib on both sides as on each side v stitches and rib stitches alternate.

Thus I decided to use some purl stitches in the design and create a band around the outside of the rug as part of the knitting. So, this is not an extra band; it is woven or knitted into the rug.

This is done by making purl stitches at the back of the work - the return needle - starting at the eighth stitch before the end of the needle, purling four stitches and ending with knitting the last four stitches. The effect is that a band that seems to run alongside the edge of the rug.

When making the rug, this did not look all that exciting; the edge wanted to curl and show bubbles. I had to wait until the end when I would wash the rug to see what the final result would be.

The reward was rather amazing. As soon as the rug was wet, the surface straightened out and lay beautifully flat, showing this decorative flat band running round the edge. The effect is that the four outer stitches make the border, and the next four stitches make up the band.
This site needs an editor - click to learn more!

Add New+Material+and+New+Design+for+a+Round+Rug to Twitter Add New+Material+and+New+Design+for+a+Round+Rug to Facebook Add New+Material+and+New+Design+for+a+Round+Rug to MySpace Add New+Material+and+New+Design+for+a+Round+Rug to Del.icio.us Digg New+Material+and+New+Design+for+a+Round+Rug Add New+Material+and+New+Design+for+a+Round+Rug to Yahoo My Web Add New+Material+and+New+Design+for+a+Round+Rug to Google Bookmarks Add New+Material+and+New+Design+for+a+Round+Rug to Stumbleupon Add New+Material+and+New+Design+for+a+Round+Rug to Reddit




Mason-Dixon Knitting, The Curious Knitters' Guide
Plastic Bag Rug
Tearing and Cutting Fabrics
RSS
Related Articles
Editor's Picks Articles
Top Ten Articles
Previous Features
Site Map


For FREE email updates, subscribe to the Rugmaking Newsletter


Past Issues


print
Printer Friendly
bookmark
Bookmark
tell friend
Tell a Friend
forum
Forum
email
Email Editor


Content copyright © 2014 by Iris ten Holder. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Iris ten Holder. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact BellaOnline Administration for details.

g


g features
All About Fabric - Toothbrush Rugs

Latch Hook Tools and Supplies

Country Living Country Decorating

Archives | Site Map

forum
Forum
email
Contact

Past Issues
memberscenter


vote
Poetry
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Less than Monthly



BellaOnline on Facebook
g


| About BellaOnline | Privacy Policy | Advertising | Become an Editor |
Website copyright © 2014 Minerva WebWorks LLC. All rights reserved.


BellaOnline Editor