Lying Blind Book Review

Lying Blind Book Review
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Title: Lying Blind: A Nan Vining Mystery (Nan Vining Mysteries Book 6)
Author: Diane Emley
Published: February 28, 2017, Alibi
No. of Pages: 254
Cover Price: $4.99 Kindle



In the sixth installment of the Nan Vining Mystery series, Lying Blind, Diane Emley weaves a story of death and deception, when Nan’s long-time boyfriend, Police sergeant Jim Kissick is called to the scene of a floating body in the swimming pool of old friends, Teddy and Rebecca Sexton. Nan’s senses tell her that something is amiss, and her investigation uncovers evidence that points to Jim. This not only makes her suspicious of her long-time love, but also threatens to ruin what was previously a strong relationship.

Emley has done an excellent job of developing her characters – they are believable and seem real. She is also a good storyteller, and the story unfolds with twists and turns, as well as building suspense that is palpable throughout. Nan Vining is an exceptional protagonist; she’s clever and is able to figure things out even when personal emotions are threatening to prejudice her.

Readers will find themselves suspecting several different characters as the story progresses, but the end will be surprising. The book is well-written, the story flows, and the novel is hard to put down. Although it’s a good idea to read the previous novels in the series, this book also makes a good standalone, and there is enough background information to keep readers enlightened. The writing is good enough, however, that readers will want to pick up installments one through five. The book has no blatant violence, so it is suitable for most readers. It’s definitely worth a read.

Special thanks to NetGalley for supplying a review copy of this book.





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This content was written by Karen Hancock. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Karen Hancock for details.