Roy Feuchtwanger - Doily

Roy Feuchtwanger - Doily

Needlecraft Magazine Year Unknown Dec. pg. 12
Tatted Doily by Roy Feuchtwanger

This doily caught my eye because the tatter seems to have been a gentleman. The name listed is Roy Feuchtwanger. I can not remember seeing a gentleman's name in the many vintage patterns I have read. Roy was a traditional shuttle tatter and this doily design reflects it. The doily is tatted in 8 rows. It begins with a round center ring and is followed by a traditional small ring large ring section attaching to the center ring. Row 3 builds width quickly as it is just an alternating ring and chain pattern. The denseness in row 4 comes from the traditional opposing small ring, large ring section attaching to the picots on the chain of row 3. Row 5 is again a width builder of alternating ring and chain design. Row 6 is all chains. Row 7 repeats the traditional opposing small ring, large ring section attaching to the picots on the chain of row 6. And, most traditional of all is the outer row. Row 8 is a familiar hen and chicks on eggs pattern.



Needlecraft Magazine Year Unknown Dec. pg. 12 Tatted Doily by Roy Feuchtwanger



Pattern begins with a round center ring. Using one shuttle leave a foot long tail which you can use to climb out into row 2.

Center Ring: R of 12 picots separated by 2 ds. Using long tail create a mock 13th picot.

Split ring 4 / 4 do not reverse work (dnrw) Leave bare thread space (bts) (let long tail dangle until last ring is tatted.)

Large ring 4 - 4 - 4 - 4 close ring (clr), btw, rw

Small ring 4 + (join to next picot on center ring) 4 clr, bts, rw

Large ring 4 + (join to previous large ring) 4 - 4 - 4 close ring (clr), btw, rw, continue around.

Make the last large ring a split ring using the long tail.
Split ring 4 + 4 / 4 + 4 clr, dnrw, make mock picot to climb out in row 3.


Row 3 add second thread for chains. Hide the tail from row 2 in the first chain

CH 4 - 2 - 2 - 4 rw

R 4 - 4 + (join to large ring of row 2) 4 - 4 clr, rw

CH 4 - 2 - 2 - 4 rw, continue around

Make the last chain a split chain climbing out at the third picot in row 4



Row 4 climbing in with split ring Split ring 4 / 4 clr, dnrw, bts, climb out to large ring.

Large ring 4 - 4 - 4 - 4 close ring (clr), btw, rw

Small ring 4 + (join to next picot on chain) 4 clr, bts, rw

Large ring 4 + (join to previous large ring) 4 - 4 - 4 close ring (clr), btw, rw, continue around.

Make the last large ring a split ring using the second thread.



Row 5 climb in with split ring.

Split ring 4 - 4 / 4 - 4 clr, dnrw

CH 7 rw

R 4 - 4 - 4 - 4 clr, rw

CH 7 rw

R 4 - 4 + (skip one large ring from row 4 and join to the nest large ring) 4 - 4 clr rw

CH 7 rw

R 4 - 4 - 4 - 4 clr, rw

CH 7 rw

Tat the first 7 ds of the last chain,then a split chain coming back to the last outward facing ring and make it a split ring climbing out at the center picot.



Row 6 is all chains.
CH 5 - 4 - 4 - 5 + (join to center picot of next ring from row 5) continue around.
Climb out if preferred to row 7.


Row 7 small rings join to the picots of the chains from row 6

Small ring 3 - 2 + 2 - 3 clr rw bts

Large ring 4 - 4 - 4 - 4 clr rw bts

Repeat around joining large rings at the side picots. However, after making three small rings, add a small ring that does not attach to the chain to add ease and width to the doily.



Row 8 is the Hen and chicks on eggs pattern.

*Egg rings = 3 - 3 + (join to row 7) 3 - 3 rw bts

Chick = 6 - 6 clr rw bts

Repeat egg ring

Hen = 5 + (join to chick) 6 - 6 - 5 clr rw bts

Repeat egg ring

Repeat chick ring

Repeat from * around.



I would love to add a new model for this pattern, especially one in glorious color!

Enjoy!



Needlecraft Magazine Year Unknown Dec. pg. 12 Tatted Doily of 8 rows by Roy Feuchtwanger





You Should Also Read:
Vintage tatting patterns
Leo Vonn - Gentleman Tatter
Jan Stawasz Tatter from Poland

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