logo
g Text Version
Beauty & Self
Books & Music
Career
Computers
Education
Family
Food & Wine
Health & Fitness
Hobbies & Crafts
Home & Garden
Money
News & Politics
Relationships
Religion & Spirituality
Sports
Travel & Culture
TV & Movies

dailyclick
Bored? Games!
Nutrition
Postcards
Take a Quiz
Rate My Photo

new
Natural Living
Folklore and Mythology
Baptist
Florida
Cosmetics
Distance Learning
Reading


dailyclick
All times in EST

Full Schedule
g
g Tatting Site

BellaOnline's Tatting Editor

g

Boutonniere


De point en point presents No. D.
L' Art de la Frivolite, Canadian Spool Cotton Co.
French, undated, saved by the Antique Pattern Library

For those who are thinking about teaching or who like to tat vintage patterns, this little pattern is a great teaching lesson. It typifies the reason that so much time is taken to update patterns for the modern tatter.

For a Boutonniere

french text of boutonniere pattern and photo, L' Art de la Frivolite, Canadian Spool Cotton Co, pg. 5
Please read the additional instructions below before actually beginning to tat.

Materials: 1 ball thread ( 6 cord, size 30 J.P. Coats suggested.)

Using one shuttle, make the center ring.
R 1 (- 1) x 20 clr Cut and tie.

1st round R 3 - 3 + (join to picot of center ring) 3 - 3 clr rw
*CH 4 (- 2) x 4, - 4 rw
R 3 - 3 + (skip next picot and join to the following picot) 3 - 3 clr rw
Repeat from * 8 times (this creates 10 rings.)
CH 4 (- 2) x 4, 4 + (join at the base of the of the first ring of this round.)
Cut and Tie.

Second round, join to a free picot on the center ring.
*CH 6 (- 2) x 19, - 6, + (join to the next free picot of the center ring.)
Repeat from * around. Join to the last chain to the start of the round. Cut and Tie.

The resulting flower is very frilly and feminine looking, great for a corsage or bouquet. However, if this is intended to be a gentleman's boutonniere, then perhaps a few less decorative picots might be preferred.

Let's study the construction of this flower a little more closely. Did you notice the "cut and tie" instructions? Cut and tie was common in the "old days", but it made for more work.

The first time it appears is after the center ring is completed. Then the tatter is instructed to attach the second thread to continue. This makes one unnecessary set of tails to hide. To avoid this, simply leave the shuttle attached to the ball, or wind two shuttles continuous thread method (CTM.)

At the end of the first round, the tatter is advised to join to the start of the round and again cut and tie. Also unnecessary. Instead make a shuttle lock join to the start of the round, pull the shuttle thread to the back of the work and join to the next free standing picot on the center ring. Continue into the next chain which begins the second round.

Thus three sets of tails to hide has been reduced to just the ending tails.
Enjoy!
Add Boutonniere to Twitter Add Boutonniere to Facebook Add Boutonniere to MySpace Add Boutonniere to Del.icio.us Digg Boutonniere Add Boutonniere to Yahoo My Web Add Boutonniere to Google Bookmarks Add Boutonniere to Stumbleupon Add Boutonniere to Reddit




French Tatting Terms
RSS
Related Articles
Editor's Picks Articles
Top Ten Articles
Previous Features
Site Map


For FREE email updates, subscribe to the Tatting Newsletter


Past Issues


print
Printer Friendly
bookmark
Bookmark
tell friend
Tell a Friend
forum
Forum
email
Email Editor


Content copyright © 2015 by Georgia Seitz. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Georgia Seitz. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Georgia Seitz for details.

g


g features
Hanky corner Is it chemical lace?

Li'l David's Snowflake by Harolah Cheser

Snowflakes in Split Ring Tatting K Bovard

Archives | Site Map

forum
Forum
email
Contact

Past Issues
memberscenter


vote
Poetry
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Less than Monthly



BellaOnline on Facebook
g


| About BellaOnline | Privacy Policy | Advertising | Become an Editor |
Website copyright © 2016 Minerva WebWorks LLC. All rights reserved.


BellaOnline Editor