logo
g Text Version
Beauty & Self
Books & Music
Career
Computers
Education
Family
Food & Wine
Health & Fitness
Hobbies & Crafts
Home & Garden
Money
News & Politics
Relationships
Religion & Spirituality
Sports
Travel & Culture
TV & Movies

dailyclick
Bored? Games!
Nutrition
Postcards
Take a Quiz
Rate My Photo

new
Houseplants
Romance Movies
Creativity
Family Travel
Southwest USA
Irish Culture
Home Finance


dailyclick
All times in EST

Full Schedule
g
g Pregnancy Site

BellaOnline's Pregnancy Editor

g

What You Need to Know About PPD

Guest Author - Vanessa Pruitt

No woman wants to think about the possibility of postpartum depression (PPD) when they are pregnant, but it's important to know the signs and symptoms so that you can recognize them and seek help when you need it.

Postpartum depression is normal. Approximately 10 to 15% of women suffer from some type of mood disorder during the postpartum months. These figures make postpartum depression one of the most common illnesses today. Still, most women seem to think that it won't happen to them. If you suffer from postpartum depression after your baby is born, know that you are not alone and you are not abnormal.

The incidence of PPD is high for several reasons, the most common reason being the hormonal fluctuations that women experience in the months after giving birth.

One of the most common myths about postpartum depression is that it always involves feelings of sadness. Some women experience resentment, anger, guilt, loss of control, inability to bond with their baby, inability to cope, and may feel as if they are worthless or a “bad” parent. Whatever your feelings may be, if they feel overwhelming or out of the norm, seek help.

PPD is more than just hormones. Hormones do play a part, but there are many factors that influence PPD. Exhaustion, lack of coping mechanisms, lack of support, and having a “high needs” baby can all affect your emotions after your baby is born.

Sometimes, having more help with the baby and more knowledge about parenting can have a great impact. Other times, counseling or medication may be necessary.

There is no shame in asking for help, whether that be from friends, family members, or professionals. Simple things like having someone watch the baby while you take a nap, chatting with an experienced mother, or confirming with your pediatrician that your baby has colic and you're not a bad mother can have a huge impact on your emotions and your ability to cope.

There is also nothing wrong with seeking counseling or taking medication if needed. The most important thing is that you get the help that you need early on, for the sake of you and your baby's health and well-being.

Tips for Preparing During Pregnancy:

- Set up your support system of family and friends.

- Line up help for meals, housework, and older children for the first few weeks after baby arrives.

- Educate yourself, your partner, and your support system on the signs and symptoms of PPD.

- Prepare yourself for the possibility of caring for a “high needs” baby.

- Have at least one person you can call while crying and holding a screaming baby at 3am.
This site needs an editor - click to learn more!

Add What+You+Need+to+Know+About+PPD to Twitter Add What+You+Need+to+Know+About+PPD to Facebook Add What+You+Need+to+Know+About+PPD to MySpace Add What+You+Need+to+Know+About+PPD to Del.icio.us Digg What+You+Need+to+Know+About+PPD Add What+You+Need+to+Know+About+PPD to Yahoo My Web Add What+You+Need+to+Know+About+PPD to Google Bookmarks Add What+You+Need+to+Know+About+PPD to Stumbleupon Add What+You+Need+to+Know+About+PPD to Reddit




Preparing to Breastfeed Your Baby
The Importance of a Babymoon
The Postpartum Doula
RSS
Related Articles
Editor's Picks Articles
Top Ten Articles
Previous Features
Site Map


For FREE email updates, subscribe to the Pregnancy Newsletter


Past Issues


print
Printer Friendly
bookmark
Bookmark
tell friend
Tell a Friend
forum
Forum
email
Email Editor


Content copyright © 2014 by Vanessa Pruitt. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Vanessa Pruitt. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact BellaOnline Administration for details.

g


g features
Archives | Site Map

forum
Forum
email
Contact

Past Issues
memberscenter


vote
Poetry
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Less than Monthly



BellaOnline on Facebook
g


| About BellaOnline | Privacy Policy | Advertising | Become an Editor |
Website copyright © 2014 Minerva WebWorks LLC. All rights reserved.


BellaOnline Editor