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What Daughters Teach Their Mothers


Daughters shine a light in the lives of their mothers. There is something about the mother-daughter relationship that cannot be replicated with sons (no offense, sons). No matter who they are, daughters claim a special place in a mother’s heart.

Some of our daughters are just like we are, and others seem to be the complete opposite. Some of our daughters possess character traits we wish we had. Some daughters challenge us to be our most patient, best possible Self. Some daughters stay as sweet as the day they were born. Other daughters find mood swings and hormones more comforting in their daily routine.

Daughters remind us of who we were (and how far we’ve come). Daughters like a lot of clothes in their closets but prefer to wear a few things over and over. Daughters think they like something, remove the tags, and decide they don’t like it after all. Daughters watch the older girls walk by and dream of days ahead.

Daughters are spirited, fun, and loving. Daughters like to snuggle. Daughters are emotional and can start crying for any unknown reason. Daughters enjoy showing you their tricks and talents.

When our daughter was born, we made sure to tell her how smart she was and how much she enjoyed science – especially when other people told her how cute she was. But, somehow, the way her hair looks still became important. Our daughter likes to express herself. She wears mismatched clothes (and not because it’s in fashion).

Daughters like to help around the house. They are the best bed makers, folders, and putter awayers. When they want to be. When they don’t, daughters are just as messy as their fathers. Daughters grow up too fast.

It is their job to remind us what a broken heart is, something we didn’t think we’d have to feel again once we found true love. Daughters show us how to dance on lily pads and experience boundless joy.

Daughters fill our bulletin boards with pictures that say: “I love you”. They’ll come along willingly to run errands. And they’ll get excited to see you after school. At least until they get older.

Daughters are independent. Or perhaps they are clingy. They are verbose or, maybe, shy. They are moody – or is it sensitive? They know what they want, but they are free to change their mind whenever they would like. Daughters are a bit of everything.

Daughters add adventure, contemplation, and wonder to the world. Their love is a blossom that opens and closes with the sun. Our daughters are loyal, loving, and limitless. When a mom has her first daughter, she knows life will never be the same again.
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What Sons Teach Their Moms
Showing Love to Children
Quality Moments with Children
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Content copyright © 2013 by Lisa Polovin Pinkus. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Lisa Polovin Pinkus. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Lisa Polovin Pinkus for details.

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