logo
g Text Version
Beauty & Self
Books & Music
Career
Computers
Education
Family
Food & Wine
Health & Fitness
Hobbies & Crafts
Home & Garden
Money
News & Politics
Relationships
Religion & Spirituality
Sports
Travel & Culture
TV & Movies

dailyclick
Bored? Games!
Nutrition
Postcards
Take a Quiz
Rate My Photo

new
European Travel
Action Movies
Bible Basics
Houseplants
Romance Movies
Creativity
Family Travel


dailyclick
All times in EST

Full Schedule
g
g African Culture Site

BellaOnline's African Culture Editor

g

Chi Wara - Mythical Antelope

Guest Author - Jeanne Egbosiuba Ukwendu

A Chi Wara (also called Chiwara, Ci Wara, or Tyi Wara) is a ritual headdress with a stylized representation of an antelope. Some say the Chi Wara headdress may represent a combination of antelope, anteater, or pangolin. The Chi Wara is said to be one half man and one half antelope. Chi Wara is a mythical creature and founder of the Bamana tribe (Mali) said to have taught them successful farming.

Chi Wara Female HeaddressChi Wara Male HeaddressThe Chi Wara dance in the fields in a male/female pair. This is to teach that men and women must both work to guarantee a successful harvest. Generally, the female (representing earth) dances behind the male (representing sun). The pair of Chi Wara are covered with a fiber costume which represents rain. The faces of the dancers are covered and usually have their faces painted so you can't see their faces. The headdresses are tied to the dancers heads and they also carry a long staff. The male Chi Wara will leap around to represent the antelope and scratch the ground with his horns or staff as a demonstration on how to cultivate the earth to sow crops. The female dancer will fan the male dancer in order to spread his powers to the people gathered around.

The headdress, a stylized antelope, is created in both genders. On the right is a male Chi Wara headdress. The male headdress has bent horns and a phallus. The phallus is low to the ground symbolizing the fertilization of the ground for planting. The male Chi Wara has a zig zag pattern representing the sun's path in the sky.

The female version of the headdress, on the left, usually has straight horns (this example oddly has bent horns) and a baby Chi Wara. If you look closely at the baby on her back you can see it is a male - note the zig zag pattern and phallus.


Add Chi+Wara+%2D+Mythical+Antelope to Twitter Add Chi+Wara+%2D+Mythical+Antelope to Facebook Add Chi+Wara+%2D+Mythical+Antelope to MySpace Add Chi+Wara+%2D+Mythical+Antelope to Del.icio.us Digg Chi+Wara+%2D+Mythical+Antelope Add Chi+Wara+%2D+Mythical+Antelope to Yahoo My Web Add Chi+Wara+%2D+Mythical+Antelope to Google Bookmarks Add Chi+Wara+%2D+Mythical+Antelope to Stumbleupon Add Chi+Wara+%2D+Mythical+Antelope to Reddit




Griot - A West African Tradition
What is a Khanga?
African Black Soap
RSS
Related Articles
Editor's Picks Articles
Top Ten Articles
Previous Features
Site Map


For FREE email updates, subscribe to the African Culture Newsletter


Past Issues


print
Printer Friendly
bookmark
Bookmark
tell friend
Tell a Friend
forum
Forum
email
Email Editor


Content copyright © 2014 by Jeanne Egbosiuba Ukwendu. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Jeanne Egbosiuba Ukwendu. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Dawn Denton for details.

g


g features
Africa at the Commonwealth Games 2014

Eco-lodge Sustainable Tourism in Senegal

Overview of HIV/Aids

Archives | Site Map

forum
Forum
email
Contact

Past Issues
memberscenter


vote
Poetry
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Less than Monthly



BellaOnline on Facebook
g


| About BellaOnline | Privacy Policy | Advertising | Become an Editor |
Website copyright © 2014 Minerva WebWorks LLC. All rights reserved.


BellaOnline Editor