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Easy Melt and Pour Soapmaking

Guest Author - Robin Rounds Whittemore

Before we begin, let me tell you that there are many different kinds of soaps to be made and many different ways to make them. Since I am someone with little patience, and always in a hurry, I usually buy already made glycerin soap bars; which can be purchased at most grocery or drug stores. You can even purchase blocks of glycerin on line or at many craft stores.

Making melt and pour glycerin soap is very easy to do, and the soaps make wonderful gifts. You are the designer. You can choose which color and fragrance to use. There is also the choice of no color or fragrance for people with allergies or sensitivities. Just by pouring melted glycerin into fancy molds, you can call it your own.

As this article was written, the basic materials used were: microwave oven – 1100 watt; a Tupperware Square 1 container for melting the glycerin; a 1 pound block of glycerin; a soap mold, fragrance oil, and color from a craft store; a toothpick, and scissors.

STEP 1 – Melting: Place the melting container with the glycerin block in the microwave for 30 seconds to get it soft. If you need to, use scissors to cut off some of the soft glycerin until the remainder lays down flat in the container. As microwave times may vary, keep heating the glycerin at 30 second intervals until it is all melted.

STEP 2 – Pouring into the molds: You should fill each mold up to the top. Should some spill over, it is easy to clean up. Remember, it is just soap.

Author’s note: A soap mold is what you should purchase. Candy molds are usually not thick enough to hold the heat from the melted glycerin.

STEP 3 – Adding color: When the glycerin is melted and poured, add 5 drops of the color of your choosing. Use the toothpick to stir until blended. If you want more color, keep adding 3 – 5 drops at a time and stir. It is best to add a little color at a time as it is easier to add more color than it is to take away. You can, of course, melt more glycerin to add if you need to subdue the color.

Author’s note: You can even add color to each individual soap mold to have many colors in just one batch. You do need to work quickly though, before the soap hardens. You could also do the fragrance first as it really doesn’t make a difference in the outcome.

Should you choose not to add color, you may skip to the next step.

STEP 4 – Including fragrance: When you have the color just right, start the next process by adding in the fragrance. If you like light fragrances, usually a teaspoon will do if you have at least a pound of glycerin melted. Before you add more fragrance, make repeated checks by smelling the melted glycerin to see if you need more. Put in as little, or as much as you would like.

Author’s note: As in the step above, you can pour different fragrances into each little mold once it has been poured and colored. You do need to act quickly if you are going to take this step. You could also do the fragrance before you add color as it really doesn’t make a difference in the outcome.

Should you choose not to add fragrance, you may skip to the next step.

STEP 5 – Hardening: Pour what you have melted into your molds and let them sit undisturbed until they harden. Hardening may take up to an hour, but usually only needs about 30 minutes.

STEP 6 – Releasing soap from the molds: You should just be able to turn the molds upside down and press with your thumbs to release the soap. If you are not able to do so easily, try placing the soap and mold in the freezer for about 10 minutes. Try to release the soap again. It should come out with no problem.
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Content copyright © 2013 by Robin Rounds Whittemore. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Robin Rounds Whittemore. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Juliette Samuel for details.

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