logo
g Text Version
Beauty & Self
Books & Music
Career
Computers
Education
Family
Food & Wine
Health & Fitness
Hobbies & Crafts
Home & Garden
Money
News & Politics
Relationships
Religion & Spirituality
Sports
Travel & Culture
TV & Movies

dailyclick
Bored? Games!
Nutrition
Postcards
Take a Quiz
Rate My Photo

new
Action Movies
Bible Basics
Houseplants
Romance Movies
Creativity
Family Travel
Southwest USA


dailyclick
All times in EST

Full Schedule
g
g Crafts for Kids Site

BellaOnline's Crafts for Kids Editor

g

Living Easter Baskets

Guest Author - Kimberly Misra

Making living Easter baskets is a fun way to celebrate spring and the return of the gardening season. A living Easter basket is simply a basket lined with real grass, rather than plastic Easter grass. Eggs and Easter treats can be tucked right into the growing grass. When Easter is over, the grass can be removed from the basket and planted outside.

Start your living Easter baskets two weeks before Easter to give the grass time to sprout and grow. You will need potting soil, a bag of quick growing grass seed, and an Easter basket for each child. Plastic weave baskets hold up better to soil and water than wicker baskets. If you'd rather use wicker baskets, just line them with plastic wrap to protect the bottoms. You may even want to line plastic weave baskets with the wrap to make them easier to clean.

Send the kids outside to gather small pebbles or gravel to place in the bottom of the lined baskets. The pebbles will help the soil drain better. Gather enough pebbles or gravel to cover the bottom of the basket with a thin layer. Fill the basket with potting soil, up to about two inches from the top, and lightly water the soil. The soil should be nice and damp, but not waterlogged.

Next, sprinkle grass seed all over the top. Don't be afraid to use a generous amount; lots of seed will ensure a thick covering of grass. Tamp the seeds down gently with your fingers to fix them in place. Use a spray bottle or mister to gently water the seeds. A spray bottle is easier than a watering can for
kids to use; it won't be as likely to wash the seeds away.

Place the baskets in a sunny windowsill and check on them daily. Mist the seeds with water as needed to keep them from drying out. After a few days, the seeds should begin to sprout. Once the grass is growing well, you can use a watering can to water it instead of the mister. Continue to be careful not to let the soil dry out or get too waterlogged. If your grass gets too long, just give it a trim with a pair of scissors.

After Easter kids can plant their grass outdoors, perhaps filling in a few bare patches in the spring lawn. The baskets can be washed out and saved for next year.
Add Living+Easter+Baskets to Twitter Add Living+Easter+Baskets to Facebook Add Living+Easter+Baskets to MySpace Add Living+Easter+Baskets to Del.icio.us Digg Living+Easter+Baskets Add Living+Easter+Baskets to Yahoo My Web Add Living+Easter+Baskets to Google Bookmarks Add Living+Easter+Baskets to Stumbleupon Add Living+Easter+Baskets to Reddit




RSS | Related Articles | Editor's Picks Articles | Top Ten Articles | Previous Features | Site Map


For FREE email updates, subscribe to the Crafts for Kids Newsletter


Past Issues


print
Printer Friendly
bookmark
Bookmark
tell friend
Tell a Friend
forum
Forum
email
Email Editor


Content copyright © 2014 by Kimberly Misra. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Kimberly Misra. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Launa Stout for details.

g


g features
Halloween - Candy Corn Pots

Flower Pot of Pens

How to Make Bath Salts

Archives | Site Map

forum
Forum
email
Contact

Past Issues
memberscenter


vote
Poetry
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Less than Monthly



BellaOnline on Facebook
g


| About BellaOnline | Privacy Policy | Advertising | Become an Editor |
Website copyright © 2014 Minerva WebWorks LLC. All rights reserved.


BellaOnline Editor