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Calcium Deposits - Joint Pain


Calcium deposits are caused by calcium building up in your joints, causing joint pain. Here is information on this situation and helpful tips to ease it.

First, note that calcium deposit buildup has nothing to do with gout and uric acid buildup. While both situations can cause joint pain, the issues are completely different. While uric acid buildup is caused by ... uric acid building up (grin), when calcium deposits collect this is "calcification" and is all about the calcium in your system. Uric acid buildup is gout. Calcification is "fake gout".

Calcium is of course very important for strong bones and strong teeth. However, as with much in life, you need to keep things in balance. If you have too little Vitamin K or magnesium in your diet, you may end up with a calcium problem.

Also, Vitamin D helps you absorb calcium properly. That is why most milks are fortified with Vitamin D, so you absorb the calcium in the milk. If you drink too much milk (or take too much vitamin D with calcium in whatever form) you could end up with excess calcium in your system. That calcium settles down in your joints in little painful blocks.

There's a very interesting link between calcium and phosphorus. When you ingest phosphorus, your body needs to "match it up" with calcium to use it. So if you ingest phosphorus and calcium at the same time, they pair up and everything is fine. If you ingest phosphorus and do not eat calcium, your body will find calcium from somewhere to match up with it. This means your bones ... your teeth ... etc. You can see why it's important to have a balanced diet!

So the key is to make sure your diet is balanced and that you are eating items in moderation. You should certainly not be calcium deficient - and on the other hand you should not eat cheese and only cheese twenty four hours a day.

If you're having issues with calcium deposits, of course go talk with a doctor, and also make sure you're getting ample Vitamin D, Vitamin K, and magnesium in your diet. These will help ensure that your calcium processing systems are all working smoothly.

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Content copyright © 2014 by Lisa Shea. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Lisa Shea. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Lisa Shea for details.

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