logo
g Text Version
Beauty & Self
Books & Music
Career
Computers
Education
Family
Food & Wine
Health & Fitness
Hobbies & Crafts
Home & Garden
Money
News & Politics
Relationships
Religion & Spirituality
Sports
Travel & Culture
TV & Movies

dailyclick
Bored? Games!
Nutrition
Postcards
Take a Quiz
Rate My Photo

new
European Travel
Action Movies
Bible Basics
Houseplants
Romance Movies
Creativity
Family Travel


dailyclick
All times in EST

Autism Spectrum Disorders: 4:00 PM

Full Schedule
g
g Martial Arts Site

BellaOnline's Martial Arts Editor

g

Internal vs. External

Guest Author - Caroline Chen-Whatley

During my What is series, I have mentioned a few times the concept of an Internal Art verses an External Art. The distinction between the two, while seemingly polar opposites, is not simply two different forms. In fact, I often like to refer to them as the Yin and Yang.

For those unfamiliar with that symbol, the circle is formed by two swirls, one white and one black. What is curious is that within the middle of each swirl lies the opposite color. So within the heart of each side lies the other. If the two concepts of Martial Arts are viewed as the sides of the Yin Yang, then so too can it be said that within every Internal Art there is External and within External there is Internal.

But what does that mean?

Internal Arts, like Tai Chi, Qi Gong, and Ba Gua, focus on the mind and spirit. They work and train how you move the energy within your body, how to heal, and how to find your center.

External Arts, like Wing Chun, Karate, and Kung Fu, focus on the body, being able to execute techniques that serve for self-defense, combat and fighting.

There are many variations to both concepts that have spread throughout the world. The quality of that art can be judged in part on how well it embraces the Yin Yang concept. Within every internal movement, a student should be able to distinguish the application, or external components.

For instance, Tai Chi is known for its beautiful fluid movements. Those same movements are external techniques that can be used against another combatant. A student who understands this can better direct their energies to work for them.

Likewise, an external student should spend time applying their concentration on the internal aspects of their art. By learning how to focus and use all your senses, not just sight, a warrior can better equip and defend themselves.

As a teacher of the Internal Arts, I continually stress to those I teach the important of embracing both of these concepts. Those that have, I can visibly see the difference. Im often amazed that external students that truly understand this importance can often pick up on my teachings with proper focus a lot faster than a student who has only emphasized one concept.

Learning both the Internal and External does not necessarily involve having to learn different Martial Arts forms. In fact, most Martial Arts forms have aspects of both incorporated into their system already. Some are more pronounced, calling out the divisions. Some are subtle, working the skills into various classes.

Systems that embrace the totality of both concepts, the Internal and External, will always prove to be more powerful than those that only focus on one other or the other.
This site needs an editor - click to learn more!

Add Internal+vs%2E+External to Twitter Add Internal+vs%2E+External to Facebook Add Internal+vs%2E+External to MySpace Add Internal+vs%2E+External to Del.icio.us Digg Internal+vs%2E+External Add Internal+vs%2E+External to Yahoo My Web Add Internal+vs%2E+External to Google Bookmarks Add Internal+vs%2E+External to Stumbleupon Add Internal+vs%2E+External to Reddit




Check out the 'What is...' Series
Martial Arts Commentaries
RSS
Related Articles
Editor's Picks Articles
Top Ten Articles
Previous Features
Site Map


For FREE email updates, subscribe to the Martial Arts Newsletter


Past Issues


print
Printer Friendly
bookmark
Bookmark
tell friend
Tell a Friend
forum
Forum
email
Email Editor


Content copyright © 2014 by Caroline Chen-Whatley. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Caroline Chen-Whatley. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact BellaOnline Administration for details.

g


g features
What is Dit Da Jow

Restarting Martial Arts After an Injury

Why are black belts black?

Archives | Site Map

forum
Forum
email
Contact

Past Issues
memberscenter


vote
Poetry
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Less than Monthly



BellaOnline on Facebook
g


| About BellaOnline | Privacy Policy | Advertising | Become an Editor |
Website copyright © 2014 Minerva WebWorks LLC. All rights reserved.


BellaOnline Editor