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BellaOnline's Deafness Editor

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 F E A T U R E   A R C H I V E  

Archive by Date | Archive by Article Title

Hearing and Weather
In South Australia we have endured a heat wave and Adelaide, our capital city, earned the title (for a day) as the hottest city in the world. I wondered whether this heat can affect our hearing. There are a few things which might affect our hearing.

How hearing loss affects people
The way you respond to your hearing loss will depend on your stage of life, your personality, the way you deal with set-backs and your support group; family, friends, colleagues. It is an individual response and not everyone is affected, nor deals with the changes in the same way.

Looking after your hearing
For most of us we have heard since we were born and we took it for granted just like we took our fingers or toes or nose for granted. We had it - we heard - and we thought there was nothing we had to do to make sure it continued.

Your baby is deaf
How would you react if, after giving birth to your perfect child, your doctor tells you your child is profoundly deaf?

Grief over hearing loss
When we lose someone or something that is important to us it is normal to experience grief. Our hearing is no exception

Eavesdropping or overhearing?
Deafness isolates us from important social and conversational experiences which are not easily caught up in other ways.

Overhearing
Not much of us give a thought to ‘Overhearing’. By this I don’t mean eavesdropping but rather hearing parts of conversations which friends, family or colleagues are having around us.

Hearing and balance
Our ears not only channel sound into our cochlea and then to the brain so we can understand noise, they also play an important role in allowing us to stand upright – to keep our balance.

Recognising noise in our environment
Hearing is far more than just hearing a sound. It is the combination of the actual physical hearing, recognising what the sound is, judging the distance, location and direction, deciding whether there is a threat and knowing whether we need to take action or can ignore it.

Does a Cochlear implant hurt?
This is a question which gets asked frequently. It comes about because there’s a fear of having something inserted into our heads and it poses a number of questions.

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