logo
g Text Version
Beauty & Self
Books & Music
Career
Computers
Education
Family
Food & Wine
Health & Fitness
Hobbies & Crafts
Home & Garden
Money
News & Politics
Relationships
Religion & Spirituality
Sports
Travel & Culture
TV & Movies

dailyclick
Bored? Games!
Nutrition
Postcards
Take a Quiz
Rate My Photo

new
European Travel
Action Movies
Bible Basics
Houseplants
Romance Movies
Creativity
Family Travel


dailyclick
All times in EST

Low Carb: 8:00 PM

Full Schedule
g
g Conception Site

BellaOnline's Conception Editor

g

Henna and conception


Choosing hair color when you want to conceive is stressful. We have all heard various things about the safety of hair color. One choice is definitely safe, but is it easy?

I'm talking about henna. Yes, the stuff that makes your hair red. Depending on the mix you make, it can make you more of a strawberry blonde versus a bold red or just enhance darker hair and cover gray.

Henna is a plant, and the part of it that makes the red dye is lawsone. It binds into the keratin in your hair, making it permanent. Truly permanent. It will fade in the first three days, but then it's the color it will forever be.

The difference is the color you get is the color you are starting with. Henna does not lift your hair color. You cannot take your hair color from dark brown to light red. On black hair, it will give some reddish highlights and cover gray, but it won't turn the hair red. On a blonde, the result is red hair.

I think Lucille Ball is probably the most famous modern henna redhead. She chose to go very bright red, but you don't have to. By adding cassia, another plant, you can tone down the red, making a strawberry blonde from a blonde. Or you can add indigo to make it more brown.

If you search the internet, you will find a lot of information on henna and how to do it yourself. It's definitely inexpensive, but I do think it's intimidating. I haven't tried it yet, but I am about to take the leap. The reason is safety.

No matter what hair color you are using, even the plant-based ones, there is some PPD or paraphenylenediamine in them. There are definitely safer ones, but it's all relative. PPD is the main allergen in hair color, and it's also a suspected carcinogen. It's not approved for use on skin, but it is approved in hair color products. As we all know, hair color definitely touches your scalp, making it curious that it's approved for hair application.

When you're trying to conceive or are pregnant, it's normal to be concerned about the chemicals you use on your hair. If you want a truly safe hair color, it's henna, but watch out for products called "compound henna." They contain other ingredients like metals that cause allergies, too.
Add Henna+and+conception to Twitter Add Henna+and+conception to Facebook Add Henna+and+conception to MySpace Add Henna+and+conception to Del.icio.us Digg Henna+and+conception Add Henna+and+conception to Yahoo My Web Add Henna+and+conception to Google Bookmarks Add Henna+and+conception to Stumbleupon Add Henna+and+conception to Reddit




RSS | Related Articles | Editor's Picks Articles | Top Ten Articles | Previous Features | Site Map


For FREE email updates, subscribe to the Conception Newsletter


Past Issues


print
Printer Friendly
bookmark
Bookmark
tell friend
Tell a Friend
forum
Forum
email
Email Editor


Content copyright © 2014 by Stacy Wiegman. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Stacy Wiegman. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Stacy Wiegman for details.

g


g features
Your job and conception

Reproductive endocrinologists and conception

Chlorella and conception

Archives | Site Map

forum
Forum
email
Contact

Past Issues
memberscenter


vote
Poetry
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Less than Monthly



BellaOnline on Facebook
g


| About BellaOnline | Privacy Policy | Advertising | Become an Editor |
Website copyright © 2014 Minerva WebWorks LLC. All rights reserved.


BellaOnline Editor