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Slavery Supported in Fiction Writings


The writings of the pro-slavery faction did not just stop at political speeches or scientific dissertations. It spread into the world of fiction writing where authors rose up to counter the writings of the abolitionist and former slave who wrote of the hard life many slaves endured. Fiction writing became an arena for the battle to be played in. It was here the pro-slave group made the biggest impact in stories that pulled the hardest at the heart of the people.

In “The Yankee Slave-Dealer” written in 1860 by someone only known as A Texan, slavery is cast in a positive light as a vocal abolitionist is challenged to actually visit the slave holding states and get a view of the institution first hand. Once he sees the ‘advantages’ of slavery and how the slaves were happy with the social structure, he becomes a slave-dealer himself. The message was how the abolitionists view was based on the press and wild ideas those of the North possessed.

Another popular piece of fiction written during the time was by Charles Jacob Peterson and titled The Cabin and Parlor. This book was about a white aristocratic family in the South who suddenly finds themselves impoverished and in a worse position than the slaves who had masters. It promoted the safety and protection the slaves possessed under the power of their master.

Pro-slave writers did not just push their facts and figures on the public. They appealed to the public’s sense of reason, humanity, and Southern pride. None of the writings were created flippantly. The authors believed passionately on keeping the institution of slavery and pulled what they believed to be concrete reasoning and support to be used in all their material. Though many against slavery might have viewed the reasoning as ignorance, slavery supporters saw it as fact and used it as so. The written word became a powerful tool for them which they needed as the abolitionists and Northern politicians were doing the same thing. The power was being discovered by both sides.



Bibliography
A Texan. The Yankee Slave-Dealer. Nashville, Archive.org, 1860, http://archive.org/details/yankeeslavedeal00abolrich.
“Arguments and Justifications.” The Abolition Project. http://abolition.e2bn.org/slavery_112.html
Berlin, Ira. Many Thousands Gone: the first two centuries of slavery in North America. Cambridge: Belknap Press, 1998.
Brown, William Wells. Clotelle, http://www.gutenberg.org/files/241/241-h/241-h.htm.
Buckingham, Goodsell. “The Bible Vindicated from the Charge of Sustaining Slavery.” Columbus: The Temperance Advocate Office, 1837. http://antislavery.eserver.org/religious/biblevindicatedrevisedfinal/.
Cobb, Thomas Read Rootes. “An Inquiry into the Law of Negro Slavery in the United States of America.” Archive.org.
Davis, Jefferson. “Speech of Mr. Davis, of Mississippi, on the Subject of Slavery in the Territories,” Archive.org, 1850.
Douglass, Frederick. The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, (Boston: Anti-Slave Office, 1848), 2-3.

Elliott, E.N., ed. “Cotton is King.” Archive.org. http://archive.org/details/cottoniskingandp28148gut.
Exodus 22: 21-24. King James Bible. BibleGateway.org,

http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Exodus%2022&version=KJV.

Fitzhugh, George. Cannibals All!, or Slaves Without Masters. 1857. http://archive.org/details/cannibalsallorsl35481gut.
Genesis 9. King James Bible. BibleGateway.com, http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Genesis%209&version=KJV.
Helper, Hinton Rowan. “Why the North Has Surpassed the South.”
The Impending Crises of the South. http://docsouth.unc.edu/nc/helper/helper.html.
“History of Slavery.” History World. http://www.historyworld.net/wrldhis/plaintexthistories.asp?historyid=ac41.
Hunt, James. On the Negro’s Place in Nature. London: Trubner, 1863.
Ingersoll, Charles Jared. “African Slavery in America.” Antislavery Literature. http://antislavery.eserver.org/proslavery/african-slavery-in-america/, 1856.
Leviticus 25. The King James. Bible Gateway.com. http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=leviticus%2025&version=KJV.
Lewis, Evan. “Address to Christians of All Denominations on the Inconsistency of Admitting Slave-Holders to Communion and Church Membership”. Antislavery Literature, 1831, http://antislavery.eserver.org/religious/addresstochristians/addresstochristians.html.
Liberty Party Platform. 1844.

http://dig.lib.niu.edu/teachers/politics-platform-d.html.

Ross, Dr. F. A. “Position of the Southern Church in Relation to Slavery.” Archive.org. 1857.
Sawyer, George S. Southern Institutes. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott & Co., 1859.
Stowe, Harriet Beecher. Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Gutenberg, 1852, http://www.gutenberg.org/files/203/203-h/203-h.htm
Webster, Daniel. Speech Before the Senate of the United States, 1848. http://memory.loc.gov/cgi/bin/query/r?ammem/rbaapc:@field(DOCID+@lit(rbaapc3310 0div3))
Wilson, William. “The Great American Question”. http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/rbaapc:@gield(DOCID+@lit(rbappc34000div0)), 1848.
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Content copyright © 2013 by Rebecca Graf. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Rebecca Graf. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Rebecca Graf for details.

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