logo
g Text Version
Beauty & Self
Books & Music
Career
Computers
Education
Family
Food & Wine
Health & Fitness
Hobbies & Crafts
Home & Garden
Money
News & Politics
Relationships
Religion & Spirituality
Sports
Travel & Culture
TV & Movies

dailyclick
Bored? Games!
Nutrition
Postcards
Take a Quiz
Rate My Photo

new
European Travel
Action Movies
Bible Basics
Houseplants
Romance Movies
Creativity
Family Travel


dailyclick
All times in EST

Low Carb: 8:00 PM

Full Schedule
g
g Ethnic Beauty Site

BellaOnline's Ethnic Beauty Editor

g

Should You Change Your Look

Guest Author - April Alisa Marquette

Someone is always suggesting we change, enhance, or modify our look. Every season, manufacturers of cosmetics and clothing tell consumers that updating their look is necessary. However, as Ethnic Beauties, aren’t we already fine? I say that we are, for it is not what we wear, the things that we acquire, or even those items that we hope for that make us beautiful. Who we are -- our inner beings -- are what make us beautiful.

I happened to be reading a book on beauty this past weekend. In it were lovely photos of women like Jada Pinkett Smith, Pam Grier, Cameron Diaz, and Salma Hayek to name a few. The thirty or so celebrated women in the book were interviewed. All were asked to give their definition of beauty. Although the answers varied, there was a common thread. Each woman, considered beautiful in her own way, stated that beauty was a belief, a state of mind. Each said, in her own unique voice that beauty, to her, was a kind of knowing that causes a woman to glow.

Many of the women also spoke of the double standard. Often we hear that as men age, they look more distinguished. However, as women age, we are bombarded with the idea that we should change our look. We even receive subliminal messages. They whisper that fine lines and gray hair are unacceptable. It is suggested that we slide under a surgeon’s knife, to correct our ‘flaws.’ In the book however, renowned singer/songwriter Joni Mitchell offered something that caused me to smile. She said that sometimes a surgically altered look nullifies the character in a woman’s face. She said that afterward, others can no longer see how the woman has lived, how much she has laughed or cried. I liked that statement the moment I read it.

Don’t get me wrong. I believe to change one’s look is fine—if it is something a woman has chosen to do. However, I do not believe we should be pressured into taking steps that we otherwise would not. If your skin is supple, or if it has the capability to be, then why not be grateful? If you like your hair, or lack thereof, then you are already fine. If you are a woman who adds extensions, or wears wigs, weaves, colorful scarves, or hats, for whatever your personal reason, then you could already be fine. Do your brown or other colored eyes serve you, and keep you from walking into walls—even if to do so you must wear contact lenses or glasses? Then you too are most likely fine.

Is your inner woman someone worth knowing? Is she compassionate, or maybe even passionate about some cause? If you believe in something, or if you’re on an eternal quest, is that not something to be proud of? Do you listen well; or maybe you’re the woman who tells fantastic jokes or captivating stories. Maybe you write poetry, or songs, or take fantastic photos. You’re a momma, a wife, a lover, jilted, or still in, a quilter, a painter, a teacher, a seamstress, a preacher, a dreamer… Perhaps you’re that one who can figure things out, before others. Are you basically happy with you? Are you an achiever? Have you done something, ever, that you can be proud of? Or perhaps you were that one who encouraged someone else to take a leap of faith. Does someone love you, even if it is your mother, or your cat or dog? If you can clean up nicely, or not; if you can, or cannot recall a time when you’ve looked hot; if you, my lovely, are any of these things and more, then you are quite possibly already fine.

Remember, it matters not what others suggest…the choice to change, or not to change, is yours and yours alone, because you are...quite possibly already fine.

Add Should+You+Change+Your+Look to Twitter Add Should+You+Change+Your+Look to Facebook Add Should+You+Change+Your+Look to MySpace Add Should+You+Change+Your+Look to Del.icio.us Digg Should+You+Change+Your+Look Add Should+You+Change+Your+Look to Yahoo My Web Add Should+You+Change+Your+Look to Google Bookmarks Add Should+You+Change+Your+Look to Stumbleupon Add Should+You+Change+Your+Look to Reddit




RSS | Related Articles | Editor's Picks Articles | Top Ten Articles | Previous Features | Site Map


For FREE email updates, subscribe to the Ethnic Beauty Newsletter


Past Issues


print
Printer Friendly
bookmark
Bookmark
tell friend
Tell a Friend
forum
Forum
email
Email Editor


Content copyright © 2014 by April Alisa Marquette. All rights reserved.
This content was written by April Alisa Marquette. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Juliette Samuel for details.

g


g features
Cleansing Ethnic Skin From The Inside Out

7 Incredible Essential Oils for Ethnic Hair Care

Beauty Tips For Ethnic Skin

Archives | Site Map

forum
Forum
email
Contact

Past Issues
memberscenter


vote
Poetry
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Less than Monthly



BellaOnline on Facebook
g


| About BellaOnline | Privacy Policy | Advertising | Become an Editor |
Website copyright © 2014 Minerva WebWorks LLC. All rights reserved.


BellaOnline Editor