A Personal Inventory and ADD

A Personal Inventory and ADD
Sometimes when a person has Attention Deficit Disorder and many members of their family also have ADD, life can feel overwhelming. How can you keep all of the balls in the air as you juggle personal and professional responsibilities? Do you ever feel like life is beating you down? There's just too much going on, and it's hard to keep everything in its place! Maybe it is time to take a personal inventory.

My mother said, "Count your blessings!"

*Who are the people that are important to you? How do they know that they matter to you? What do you do to let them know how much you care?

*What are the things that are blessings in your life? These include places, events, activities, and possessions. How is your life better because of these things?

Mama also said, "If it's broken, fix it!"

*Are there people in your life who constantly take your time and energy, yet offer nothing in the relationship? Do they understand the effect that they have on you? What can you do to improve this interpersonal dynamic ?

*What possessions do you have that are just a burden? How can you shed these things that tie you down?

When you have Attention Deficit Disorder, it helps to keep life straight by simplifying. Prize those people, places, events, and possessions that add richness and joy to your life. Find a way to reframe those relationships that are not working for you. If that doesn't help the relationship, move beyond that brokenness, and carefully consider breaking the bonds that link you together. Give away, throw away, or sell possessions that lend nothing to your happiness.

My mother said, "Maintain an attitude of gratitude!"

As we were raising our children, I became aware of how very much we had to teach them. Gratitude is a learned behavior. It helps to practice it every day. There is a program on the internet called "30 Days of Gratitude." They have a free, downloadable book with exercises to help improve a person's life by practicing daily gratitude. These tasks are not difficult or overly time consuming. The assignments are both thoughtful and encourage reflection. I highly recommend them.

In my experience, part of living well with Attention Deficit Disorder has to do with streamlining your life. Emphasize those people, places, and things that are important to you. Turn loose of the baggage in your life. Be grateful for those experiences that you have along the journey of life.

Having ADD is often not an easy complication to deal with. However, for better or worse, it helps shape who we are. You can accentuate the positive by thinking about all of the areas of your life that Attention Deficit Disorder has impacted. Are you a creative problem solver? Have you learned compassion by seeing those times when folks have lacked consideration for your struggles? When other kids breezed through schoolwork, did you learn to consciously study and organize out of self-preservation? So many of our challenges with ADD lead to later successes. It's time to take a personal inventory and be grateful for everything in our lives that shapes us.

Resource:

http://www.daysofgratitude.com/Home_Page.html This is the website for "30 Days of Gratitude." You will find a link to download their free book.


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Content copyright © 2018 by Connie Mistler Davidson. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Connie Mistler Davidson. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Connie Mistler Davidson for details.